Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Dental and Oral Health Dubai, UAE.

Day 3 :

  • Track 9: Current Concepts in Oral Health
Location: Crown Plaza, Dubai
Speaker

Chair

Zikra A Alkhayal

King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center
Saudi Arabia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Nandita Shenoy

Manipal University
India

Session Introduction

Zikra A Alkhayal

King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center
Saudi Arabia

Title: Clinical translation of stem cells: current concepts
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Zikra Alkhayal has completed her undergraduate dental training from the Royal London, England, postgraduate training in Pediatric Dentistry from University of Illinois, Chicago, USA and was the first Saudi to Obtain the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. Currently, Consultant Pediatric Dentist and Joint Appointee/Scientist, Stem Cell and Regeneration Program in King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. She was recently a Visiting Research Fellow, King’s College, London, UK and Visiting Research Associate, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, USA. Her current interests are in the development of Special Care Dentistry for the medically compromised, procedural sedation, quality of care and the translational aspects of stem cell and regeneration.

Abstract:

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry \"recognizes the emerging field of regenerative medicine and encourages dentists to follow future evidence-based literature in order to educate parents about the collection, storage, viability, and use of dental stem cells with respect to autologous regenerative therapies.\" (2008) This perspective-presentation will provide an overview on the current concepts of stem cell clinical applications with specific emphasis on mesenchymal dental stem cells as they relate to tissue repair and regeneration.The objectives of the presentation are threefold. First, to review the research to date in the field of dental stem cells in clinical applications. Second,to provide an overview of the types of stem cells that can be isolated from the dental and gingival tissues and compare with other sources of mesenchymalstem cells. Third, to discuss the issues focusing on the clinical translation of stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine and dentistry. The presentation will conclude by highlighting the challenging yet promising potential of stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine/dentistry in offering the possibility of repairing tissues damaged from disease including certain cancers and hence improving patient outcomes.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Nahla Al Ibrahim has graduated from King Saud University, Saudi Arabia with a bachelor in dental surgery. She joined University of Leeds, UK for postgraduate studies in Pediatric Dentistry and graduated with distinction. She won the Charles and Eleanor Knowels Prize in Child Dental Health for the best dissertation and won the Maxine Pollard Prize in Pediatric Dentistry for the best clinical presentation cases in 2007. She was granted the Canadian Fellowship in Pediatric Dentistry by the Royal College of Dentists of Canada in 2008. Currently, she works in National Guard Health Affairs, Saudi Arabia as a consultant in Pediatric dentistry. She is interested in implementing and improving research in dental field, Hypnotism and Conscious Sedation and use of intraoral appliances (Palatal Plates) for speech correction.

Abstract:

Dental caries is considered one of the most common chronic and infectious diseases in the developing world and a major oral health problem in most industrialized countries. Fluoride plays the major role in prevention of dental caries. The cariostatic effect of fluorideis believed to be mostly exerted by its topical rather than systemic effectsthrough the constant presence at the plaque-saliva-enamel interface.Fluoride-containing products such as dentifrices, mouthrinses and topically applied gels provide caries preventive benefits via the topical mechanisms of inhibition of demineralisation, enhancement of remineralisation and inhibition of bacterial enzymes. However, in cases of high bacterial challenge and/or xerostomia or salivary dysfunction, even high levels of fluoride therapy may be insufficient to balance the effect of the pathological factors, and caries process. Furthermore, the biggest problem with the home-use products is the need for patient compliance on a daily basis.Fluoride was incorporated into a number of dental restorative and orthodontic materials to act as fluoride reservoir intraorally. These dental materials exhibit a burst effect and the fluoride release is short lived. The continuous release of fluoride from intraoral fluoride-releasing devices has been demonstrated to provide significant sustained elevation of salivary fluoride levels for prolonged periods and to enhance remineralisation of early enamel lesions in situ. An overview of the oral fluoride delivery systems will be highlighted.

Speaker
Biography:

Lisa Marie Kao R.D.H.,B.S has 17 years of clinical experience in cosmetic, prosthodontic, periodontal and general dental procedures. She has worked in many New York City high end based cosmetic dental practices and identified a need for porcelain toothpaste for patients who have cosmetic dental treatments. Unable to recommend an oral care product specific to porcelain, Ms. Kao developed a porcelain veneer toothpaste, a product that would restore gloss and luster to porcelain and maintain the long term beauty of porcelain restorations. She has discovered trends and voids in the dental care market that have led to development of the DIAMYNT formulation and product. Ms. Kao is an active member of the (IADR) International Association for Dental Research (AACD) American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and (AMC) Aventura Marketing Council (Florida). Ms Kao resides between NYC and Florida. Ms. Kao is currently doing research and development on new innovative products.

Abstract:

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of experimental xylitol dentifrices with and without fluoride on in vitro root caries formation. Methods: Root surfaces from caries-free human permanent teeth (n=10) underwent debridement and a fluoride-free prophylaxis. The tooth roots were sectioned into quarters, and acid-resistant varnish was placed with two sound root surface windows exposed on each tooth quarter. Each quarter from a single tooth was assigned to a treatment group: (1) No treatment control; (2) Aquafresh Advanced (0.15% F = 1,150 ppm F); (3) Experimental xylitol dentifrice without fluoride (0.45% xylitol); and (4) Diamynt fluoride dentifrice with xylitol (0.83% sodium monofluorophosphate = 1,100 ppm F and 0.20% xylitol). Tooth root quarters were treated with fresh dentifrice twice daily (3 minutes) followed by fresh synthetic saliva rinsing over a 7-day period. Controls were exposed twice daily to fresh synthetic saliva rinsing daily over a 7-day period. In vitro root caries were created using an acidified gel (pH 4.25, 21 days). Longitudinal sections (three sections/tooth quarter, 60/group) were evaluated for mean lesion depths (water inhibition, polarized light, ANOVA, DMR). Results: Mean lesion depths were 359 ± 37 μm for the control Group; 280 ± 28 μm for Aquafresh Advanced; 342 ± 41 μm for the experimental xylitol dentifrice without fluoride; and 261 ± 34 μm for Diamynt. Aquafresh Advanced and Diamynt had mean lesion depths significantly less than those for the no treatment control and the experimental xylitol without fluoride dentifrice (P< 0.05). There were minimal non-significant differences in mean lesion depths between Aquafresh Advanced and Diamynt (P> 0.05). (Am J Dent 2013;26:56-60).

Break: Lunch Break @ Al-Jumairah Ball Room Section 3

David Drysdale

Dorset County Hospital Foundation Trust
UK

Title: Transcutaneous Carbon Dioxide Monitoring
Speaker
Biography:

Dr David Drysdale, BDS (Kings College London), MSc (Imperial College London), PGdip (Kings College London) MFDS RCS (Edinburgh) is a Locum Senior Dental Officer at Dorset County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in the South West of England. He also works as a Sedationist in several private practices in London and the South Coast of England. Dr Drysdale works mainly with peadiatric patients, adults with learning difficulties and patients who suffer extreme dental phobia. He is a member of SAAD and DTSG and is on the mentors list for both organizations.

Abstract:

Dental anxiety is very common, affecting 22% of the population. One way to increase access to dental care is by the use of BDZs in conscious sedation. These drugs are known to be safe when titrated. BDZs work by stimulating GABAA receptors within inhibitory pathways of the CNS. A consequence of this, is a reduction in respiratory drive. Thus assessing saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2) is mandatory. A pulse oximeter is normally used to do this. However a pulse oximeter, cannot detect changes in CO2 which could result from a reduction in ventillatory drive. Many practitioners prescribe supplemental oxygen to compensate for hypoventilation, which can inhibit the ability of pulse oximetry to detect hypoventilation. Transcutaneous CO2 monitoring is currently used in ICUs and neonatal units. It may, however, have a place in conscious sedation dentistry. It can be used to detect changes in CO2, and is not affected by supplemental oxygen. Modern monitors are small and easy to use, but the cost of the monitors may be prohibitive in allowing them to become a mainstay in conscious sedation dentistry.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Nandita Shenoy did her MDS in Oral Medicine and Radiology from Manipal University. Presently serving as Reader in Manipal College of Dental sciences, Mangalore. She has more than 25 publications in National and International Journals and is also serving as an editorial board member of repute. Her field of interest is Oral Cancer and Cone Beam Computed Tomography. She is certified in ISO 9001, EMS 14001 and in Bioethics.

Abstract:

Malignant neoplasm is a major cause of death in developed countries, and its incidence continues to grow, placing a heavy burden on the community. Diabetes mellitus is a serious and leading health problem worldwide and is associated with severe acute and chronic complications that negatively influence both the quality of life and survival of affected persons. Growing epidemiologic evidence suggests that people with diabetes are at significantly greater risk for cancer in general as well as for specific types of cancer, such as cancers of the breast, liver, pancreas, colon, rectum, and endometrium. Recent studies demonstrated that glucose intolerance was associated with a higher risk of oral cancer death, beginning in the prediabetic range of glucose intolerance. However, few population-based studies, especially in Asian populations, have addressed these issues or have estimated glucose intolerance status. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether prediabetes and diabetes defined by means of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test were as we undertook this study with the aim of finding out an association between impaired glucosetolerance and oral cancer along with finding out prevalence of other risk factors for oral cancer. 45 cases and 45 controls were selected for the study. Oral glucose tolerance was performed on subjects who satisfied inclusion criteria and were willing to sign informed consent form. Fifty three percent of the cases had abnormal glucose tolerance as compared to thirty one percent of the controls. It was statistically significant with a p value of 0.032. To conclude, hyperglycemia (which includes IFG, IGT and diabetes) increase the risk of oral cancer two folds, however impaired glucose tolerance alone as defined by ADA does not appear to play a role. There was a predisposition of oral cancer in males. Alcohol consumption did not show a significant difference in the case and the control patients. The associated p value was 0.067. Tobacco consumption by means of smoking or chewing was inadvertently present in fifty eight percent of the cases compared to thirty six percent of the controls. It was statistically with a p value of 0.034. Hence tobacco consumption significantly increases the risk of oral cancer. Simultaneous consumption of tobacco and alcohol also predisposes to oral cancer associated with overall and site-specific cancer mortality in oral cancer.

Break: Coffee Break @ Ball Room Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Deepa G Kamath completed her undergraduation (BDS) from College of Dental Surgery Mangalore, Manipal Academy of Higher Education(MAHE) and Masters in Dental Surgery (MDS)from Yenepoya Dental college Mangalore, Rajiv Gandhi University of Dental sciences(RGUHS). She is currently working as an Additional professor in the Dept of Periodontics,Manipal college of Dental Sciences,Mangalore,Manipaluniversity.She has to her credit 10 national and international publications. She has also authored chapters in reputed text books. She hasdone postgraduate diploma course in laser dentistry from Indian Academy of laser Dentistry

Abstract:

This study was done to assess the knowledge of patients regarding diabetes mellitus and differences in oralhealth and perceived oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients attending a weekly adult diabetic outpatient clinic in Attavar hospital Mangalore. A total of 150 diabetic patients were invited to participate in the present study. Patients who agreed to participate in the study provided written informed consent and completed a self-report questionnaire as they awaited their appointment at the outpatient clinic. The OHRQL instrument used in this survey was the shortened version of the Oral Health Impact Profile. Data was collected over a period of 6 weeks. The response rate for this particular study was 90.6%. The gender distribution study subjects were 67 males (48.6%) 71 females (51.4%) It was seen that majority of the participants 58(91.1%)] were on allopathic medication. About 87(63%) of the respondents were not aware of which type of diabetes they had. Sixty five (48.1%) of the respondents were not aware of systemic complications associated with diabetes. But in contrast to this about 99 (77.9%) of the participants were aware of the oral conditions associated with diabetes. Even though majority of the respondents had awareness about association between oral conditions and diabetes only 11(22.5%) people knew about periodontal conditions associated with diabetes .To summarize about dental visit in last six months, 38(27.5%) of the participants visited dentist in this period. In those subjects 84(63.6%) had undergone dental treatment till now. Majority of the respondents (63.7%) used toothbrush to clean their teeth. 52(37%) of the responders brushed once daily and 46(33.3%) brushed twice daily. Out of 138 respondents 48(35%) knew about interdental cleansing and frequency of usage of same varied from once daily to twice daily maximum.75(54.7%) were using mouthwash as an adjunct for oral care. It can be concluded that diabetic patients have insufficient information of the associations between oral health and overall health. It was also seen that oral health related quality of life did not significantly affect in these patients.In order to promote proper oral health and to reduce the risk of oral diseases, health professionals in both the dental and medical fields need to take the responsibility to develop programs to educate the public about the oral manifestations of diabetes and its complications on oral health.

Sathya bama Saravanan

Thaimoogambigai dental college
India

Title: Fostering failed Implants
Speaker
Biography:

FDSRCS, Reader, Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Thaimoogambigai Dental College & Hospital, Dr. MGR University, Chennai, India.

Abstract:

Implants are the way forward in restoring inevitable dentition loss. The integration of the implant and its success lie in the local available factors such as the quality of bone, timing of loading the implant and the substandard supra structures along with a compromised patient condition. A replaced implant should be able to face the challenges of a healed bone site with an increase in its diameter and with improved surface treatment. The biomechanics and the load distribution with the centric occlussal table need to be widely analysed to improve the longevity of the implant. Once the planning of the implants has been done methodically with the patient’s medical history under control, the biomechanics restored then the maintenance becomes simple. The replacements of the failed implants need to consider improving the surface area with reinforced good quality of bone.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Nidhi Manaktala has completed her BDS from Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal in 2007 and MDS (Oral Pathology) in 2011 from Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Manipal University, India. She is the currently employed as an assistant Professor in the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, MCODS, Mangalore, a leading dental institute in India.

Abstract:

Introduction: Radicular cysts (RCs) are the most common odontogenic cysts affecting the jawbones. They are associated with extensive carious lesions, pulpal necrosis and infection of the root canal and can be classified as Bay cysts (associated with the root canal), radicular cyst (associated with apex) and residual cysts (not associated with tooth). Morphological alterations in the cyst like exocytosis, spongiosis, acanthosis, atrophic epithelium and apoptotic bodies are the most common findings as reported by Santos et al (2011). Other findings include foamy macrophages, Russell’s bodies, cholesterol crystals and gland like odontogenic epithelial rests while exogenous material has been evident in few samples. Aim: The aim of the present study was to describe the histo-pathological features and possible variations of RCs in an Indian population. Materials and method: After approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee of Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, diagnosed cases of RCs (n=100) from archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology were included in the study sample and studied for morphological alterations as modified from Santos et al (2011) with inclusion of critical parameters like pattern of epithelium, severity of inflammation, presence of neutrophils and bacterial colonies. The compiled data was statistically analyzed using Chi-square test and one way ANOVA. Result: In the present study, a significant association was found between cystic epithelium and severity of inflammation. Severe inflammation was associated with an increased proliferation of epithelium and increased incidence of arcades. It was also noted that the cysts with continuous epithelium had a greater inflammatory component when compared to those with intermittent epithelium. This shows that the degree of inflammation could give us an insight into the proliferative potential of the cyst. Other morphological findings like apoptosis, giant cells and macrophages were also noted. Conclusion: The present study could be helpful giving us an insight into the proliferative potential of the cyst depending on the degree of inflammation.

Speaker
Biography:

Shaza Hamid completed her graduation in the year 2006 in Lucknow, India and gold medalist of the college. She won several honours and medals (Gold and Silver) during her under graduation period. She is currently perusing her post-graduation M. Clin. Dent in Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics from King’s College London, UK. She has been awarded Henry Schein Leadership Scholarship, in effect of demonstration of extra-ordinary ability to emerge as potential leader in the field of Dentistry and Student Rep for King’s College Dental Institute for the year 2013.

Abstract:

Glossectomy is an extremely disabling surgery severely affecting not only function but also quality of life (QoL). Problems significantly affecting QoL are associated with swallowing, speech, deglutition and drooling of saliva. Surgical reconstruction (using local flaps or distant flaps), prosthetic rehabilitation and patient adaptive capabilities in combination will determine the overall prognosis for successful rehabilitation. To replace mobile and highly sensory organ by hard immobile prosthesis is quite challenging. Post-glossectomy, local anatomy has been drastically altered as they have less physical retention potential because of surgical loss and distortion of supporting tissues. Modification required throughout various steps in prosthesis construction will be dealt in comprehensive manner and effect of final prosthesis constructed using functional impressions. Conservative prosthetic approach in successful patient rehabilitation will be emphasized. Despite aggressive life altering procedure, adequate QoL and functional deficits corrections are very much within realm of acceptable norm in carefully selected patient cohort.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. ceena denny is a Dentist from Mangalore, India. He is licenced from Karnataka, India and has been practicing for 9 Years. As far as education concerns, He has done MDS from MANIPAL UNIVERSITY, class of 2006. He has been awarded with Research incentive award. He has done certification in Mds.

Abstract:

Aims of Study: To assess the severity of disease in Oral Submucous Fibrosis(OSF),corelate the clinical, functional and histopathological staging and analyse the collagen fibres in different stages of OSF using picrosirius red stain under polarising microscope. Methodology: The study included randomly incorporated 50 subjects of which 40 were patients with OSF and 10 were in the control group. Clinical and functional staging were done depending on definite criteria. Histopathological study was done using eosin, hematoxylin and picrosirius stain. Collagen fibres were analysed for thickness and polarising colors. Further clinical, functional and histopathological staging were compared. Results: As the severity of the disease increased, clinically there was a definite increase in subjective and objective symptoms. Polarised microscopic examination revealed that there was a gradual decrease in green-greenish yellow fibres and a shift to orange-orange red was observed as the severity of the disease. Thereby it appeared that tight packing of collagen fibres increased as the disease progressed from early to advanced stages. We also observed that the comparison of clinical staging with histopathological staging was a more reliable indicator of the severity of disease. Discussion: As the severity of the disease increased, clinically, there was definite progression in subjective and objective symptoms. Polarized microscopy showed an increase in the thickness of the fibres and also a shift from greenish yellow to orange red as the severity increased. This could be due to the closely packed collagen fibres .We also observed that the comparison of functional staging with histopathological was a more relaiable indicator of the severity of the disease.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Nurgül Kömerik completed her DDS degree at the Dental School of Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey in 1992. She obtained her PhD degree at the University Collage London, Eastman Dental Institute, London, UK in 2001. Besides presentations in numerous national and international congresses, she has published many articles for her credit in reputed national and international journals. Dr. Kömerik has reviewed articles submitted to various journals in Turkey and abroad. She is the sole author of text book titled “Oral, Dental, Jaw Surgery” published by Nobel Medical Publishers, Istanbul, Turkey in 2009. She is currently practicing and teaching at the Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, Suleyman Demirel University Dental School, Isparta, Turkey in addition to pursuing an MSc degree in Healthcare Management at the Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Abstract:

Objective: To compare the proliferative activity of dental follicles surrounding impacted maxillary canines and mandibular third molars. Study design: Follicles of the impacted mandibular third molars (n:40) and maxillary canines (n:40) were removed and their epithelial proliferative activity was assessed using immunohistochemical labeling for Ki-67, minichromosome maintenance 2 (MCM-2) protein and epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). Results: The lining epithelium of the maxillary canine follicles had mean scores of 4.65±0.27 for Ki-67, 1.25±0.33 for MCM-2 and 7.30±0.23 for EGFR which were similar to those expressed in the mandibular third molar follicles (4.46±0.26 for Ki-67, 1.39±0.33 for MCM-2 and 7.21±0.20 for EGFR). EGFR expression (the other two marker were not detected), detected in the epithelial remnants in both groups, was not significantly different (7.28±0.14 in the canine group as opposed to 7.21±0.16 in the third molar group). Conclusion: Impacted mandibular third molars and maxillary canines carry similar risk of pathology development.

Speaker
Biography:

Divya Raigangar completed her graduation in the year 2010 from Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Maharashtra, India and gold medalist of the college. She won several honors and medals during her graduation period. She is currently pursuing her post- graduation in Prosthodontics from Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, India.

Abstract:

A study of implant to abutment connections is of paramount importance as it is the primary determinant of strength and stability of implant supported restorations which in turn determine the restoration’s prosthetic stability. Traditionally, the Branemark’s external hexagon has been widely used but its significant complications such as abutment screw loosening, rotational misfit at implant abutment interface and microbial penetration have led to modification of external hexagon and the development of internal implant abutment connections. This paper describes the various implant abutment connections that have evolved over time from the traditional external hexagon.

  • Track 10: Regulatory and Ethical Issues of Dentistry
    Track 11: Basic Dentistry
Location: Crown Plaza, Dubai
Speaker

Chair

Letic-Gavrilovic Anka

RAKCODS
UAE

Co-Chair

Virginia Bodolica

American University of Sharjah
UAE

Session Introduction

Letic-Gavrilovic Anka

RAKCODS
UAE

Title: Evidence based communication in dentistry
Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Letic-Gavrilovic Anka, DDS, PhD, duringlong scientific career collaborated with Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Histochemistry Department, London; Fukuoka Dental College, Department of Biochemistry, Fukuoka, Japan. Now works as Assoc.Prof. of Physiology and Biochemistry at RAKCODS, Dental College, United Arabic Emirates. Researching inoral biochemistry, immunology and basic clinical mechanism of dental implantology, Dr Anka expressed particular scientific interest in Biomaterials for bone reconstruction. Most of the work was dedicated to the regulatory role of growth factors in morphogenesis and postnatal development of the immune system and salivary glands. Recently, Dr Ankais very active in field of brain neurophysiology and practical applications. Neuromarketing is an academic approach to better understand how information leads to changes in attention, emotional responses, preference formation, choices and learning. Dr Letic’s present interest remains beautiful mystery of brain function. While there’s general agreement that attention and emotional engagement of brain, can be tracked, identifying specific emotions with confidence has been elusive. Therefore, data from neuromarketing are still best used when triangulated with more traditional data such as interviews, questionnaires, and historical data.

Abstract:

One of the most important aspects of every position of the dental team is to have excellent communication skills. Interacting with people is a key part of oral health care between professionals, within the team, with the public and especially with our patients. Understanding the basic principles of good communication should be a requirement for everyone and their application in oral health care is an absolute "must". The research on dental anxiety, dentist-patient relationship, compliance and dental attendance deals with some of the aspects of acquiring and applying communication skills. Patient’s emotional state and neurophysiological subconscious could make big difference and impact on our work and relationships inside of the team. It is obvious both, in area of General and Specialized Dentistry. Roughly 90% of our patients behavior is subconscious. They cannot actually explain to which Dental Clinic or Doctor they are preferred to direct. Traditional research, trying to answer on these dilemmas, typically involves questionnaires, focus groups, or in-depth interviews, and they are of dubious value. Neuromarketing and the behavior sciences behind it, provides new ways to look at the old question: how doctor-patients communicate and make decision? Neuroscience offers an academic approach to better understanding how information leads to changes in attention, emotional responses, preference formation, choices and learning. In order to determine the objective state and motives, measure of EEG brain activity while viewing dental images, products, films or advertisements is performed. Beside, electroencephalography ( EEG), biometric measurements, nonverbal communication skills, eye-tracking, facial coding (both automated and manual), and other technologies are available to estimate patient’s brain activity and behavior. Conclusively, neuroscience methodologies could greatly improve our understanding of the role of the emotions and the subconscious learning in determining patient’s health care objectives. Neuromarketing strategies should be foster at any level of Dental marketing, to help our patients to develop strong bonds towards chosen Clinic on long-term basis. Not only is patients' satisfaction positively related to the communicative behavior of dentists, but the principle of informed consent requires dentists also to inform their patients adequately enough for them to reach a well-informed decision about the treatment. Therefore, it remains important to train dentists in communicative skills.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Majdah Al-Khadhari got AEGD certificate from King Abdulaziz Medical City-Dental Center, Riyadh – 2008 , Then she got Saudi Board of Advanced Restorative Dentistry with honor in 2013 from Saudi commission for health specialty, Riyadh . She is working in Restorative Department in King Abdul-Aziz Medical City (National Guard) Jeddah; She is leader of Dental Quality Improvement team of National Guard primary health care centers, Jeddah. She got many awards and she presented many lectures.

Abstract:

Dental fluorosis is adisturbancethataffectsenamel formation due to excessive ingestion offluoride during enamel development.Clinically it manifestedwith various forms of changes. These changes are classified according to variousindices. Over the past decades there wasapparent increase in the prevalence of dental fluorosisamong residents in Saudi Arabia1,2,3,4 .King Abdul-Aziz university Hospital in Jeddah frequently perceived Patients with a varying degree of dental fluorosis, in search for a definite treatment of their problems. According to the degree of Fluorosis, teeth could be restored with different treatment modalities asNon-invasive, Minimally invasive and invasive restorativeprocedures, where bleaching 5,6, microabrasion6, 7, macroabrasion, compositeveneersand porcelain laminate veneers8, 9, 10are examples of these modalities. Selecting treatment modalityto ensure remarkable results, pose a significant challenge to the restorative dentist. This presentationwill provide the audience with a systematic approach inhow to diagnose and manage dental fluorosis by usingThylstrup-Fejerskov indexanddifferent treatment modalities. Practical hints will be highlighted during the presentation thataid in optimizing esthetic outcome for the selected cases.

Mohamed Khaled Ahmed Azzam

King Abdulaziz Medical City
SaudiArabia

Title: Adaptation and habituation to new dentures
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Azzam graduated from Cairo University in 1976 followed by a training program from Minnesota Dental School-Minnesota-USA in Surgery in 1982. He finished his Master’s degree-M.D.Sc in 1984 in Removable Prosthodontics from Cairo University in 1984 and then completed one year fellowship in Removable Prosthodontics in Tufts dental School, Boston –Massachusetts –USA 1989-1990. He finished his PhD –D.D.Sc in Removable Prosthodontics 1993 after which was teaching in King Abdulaziz Dental School in Saudi Arabia for ten years as an Assistant Professor in Removable Prosthodontics. Currently he is the Removable Prosthodontic Consultant in King Abdulaziz Medical City – National Guard Hospital – WR, Saudi Arabia He presented over 100 National and International lectures all over the world and in 2009 was awarded Best Oral presentation in 31st Asia Pacific Dental Congress.

Abstract:

Complete dentures, a non biological appliance, were and are still used to replace missing teeth and surrounding structures. Its main objectives are Esthetics, Speech, Function and Psychological state improvement. Dentists must realize that, just as dentate patients vary in their dental treatment complexity; edentulous patients also vary in the difficulty of their treatment plan. There are two main problems facing the removable Prosthodontist being: Denture construction which however its fabrication is at the highest standards still is an unpleasant experience to all patients in the beginning and improves by time. This varies from one to several years according to the patient’s attitude, age, gender, socio-economical level and culture. The second problem being the patient him/herself. “We must meet the mind of the patient before the mouth.” Said by M.M.Devan. Problems of edentulous patients are both physical and psychological. Good interview, communication and note how patients present themselves for the concerns of their appearance, overall attitude and expectations concerning treatment is very important. In conclusion to successfully treat edentulous patients a great deal of information is required to complete a proper diagnosis, including patient mental attitude, past and present medical and dental conditions, and extra and intra-oral examinations. In addition to the clinical experience and skill of the whole dental team.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Suprabha B.S obtained her BDS, and MDS degree in Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry from Manipal University, Manipal in the years 1997 and 1999 respectively. She is currently working as Additional Professor in the Department of Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry at Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore and has 13 years of work experience in academic field. She has 22 publications to her credit in national and international journals. She has been a reviewer for various reputed national and international journals. She has been appointed as PhD guide of Manipal University in 2012.

Abstract:

Background: Topical anaesthetic is one of the methods used to overcome pain during injection of local anaesthetic. Topical anaesthetics are available in several formulations such as aerosols, ointments, gels, lozengesand impregnated patches with different concentrations depending upon the formulations. The efficacy of one over the other of these formulations containing the same pharmacologic agent is unknown. Aim: Tocompare the pain during needle penetration using 15% lignocaine spray and 8% lignocaine gel as a topical anaesthetic during buccal infiltration of local anesthesia. Method: Study design: Randomized clinical trial. Children between 7-12 years of age, who were required to undergo operative procedures in the maxillary arch, under buccal infiltration were selected. A total of 42 patients were equally divided into two groups, Group A: 8% Lignocaine gel and Group B: 15% Lignocaine spray by random allocation. After the application of the topical anaesthetic, buccal infiltration anaesthesia was administered by an operator who was blinded to the type of topical anaesthetic used.Each child quantified the pain perceived using Wong-Baker FACES pain rating scale.A third operator, who was also blinded, assessed the pain using the FLACC behaviouralpain assessmentscale. Results: Pearson chi-square test demonstrated that there was no significant differencebetween the two groups in the FLACC scores (p=0.54). Independent t test demonstrated that there was no significant difference in patient response between the two topical agents used (p=0.07). Conclusion: Both lignocaine spray and gel are equivocal in controlling pain during needle penetration for buccal infiltration in children.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Virginia Bodolica is an Associate Professor at the American University of Sharjah (UAE) and a Visiting Faculty at the ESE Business School, Universidad de los Andes (Chile). She received her Ph.D. from HEC Montreal (Canada) and she teaches and delivers customized executive programs in the areas of strategy, governance and human resources. Her research interests are related to corporate governance issues, knowledge management practices, and relational encounters in healthcare settings. The results of her research have been published in journals such as Health Expectations, Public Health, Strategic Organization, Journal of Business Ethics, Academy of Management Annals and Strategic Management Journal.

Abstract:

Although the relationship between providers and receivers of health services is a critical component of the integrated approach to excellence in healthcare, it has been rarely examined in the stomatology sector. The agent-principal type of encounter between dentistry professionals and patients provides opportunities for the former to behave at the latter’s expense, requiring effective governance mechanisms for alleviating the emerging agency problems and ethical concerns.Relying on the agency framework of dentist-patient interactions, we provide the descriptive accounts of patients who had undergone oral health treatments in stomatological clinics located in Eastern Europe.We adopted a purposeful sampling procedure to select cases that were rich in information and displayed high levels of heterogeneity. Our study illustrates the dominant agency problems, ethical challenges and governance characteristics in each of the three identified models of dentist-patient relationship, including the dentist-centered, patient-centered and dentist–patient partnership models. We argue that explicit efforts ought to be deployed towards the establishment of partnership models of dentist–patientinteraction that might facilitate the achievement of optimal relational outcomes. Keywords:Dentist–patientrelationship; Models of interaction; Collaborative decision-making; Governance characteristics; Ethical challenges; Dentistry

Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Shaik Mohiuddin has completed his BDS from India in 2003, and then Membership in Dental surgery from Royal College of Surgeons and Physicians of Glasgow in year 2006, His inclination towards process improvement made him pursue his degree in Health care administration, he also completed a certificate Quality Management from Manitoba, Canada. He believes that the Dental profession and business development should go hand in hand. He is at presently working as Dentist and In Charge of Quality Department at Al Noor Hospital Satellite Clinics, Madinat Zayed Abu Dhabi. He is Chairman for Infection control Committee and Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Committee since over 5 years. He is also a certified Lead Auditor for ISO 9001:2008 (QMS) by Bureau Veritas International. He has delivered many trainings related to Infection control, Quality Management, Quality Audits.

Abstract:

Statement: Healthcare, in particular dentistry has made enormous progress in terms of new materials, new methods and new procedures. With all these developments comes an inherent risk to manage. A risk which may if neglected may pass through un-noticed and hurt our patients. Motivation:This presentation will give the audience some basic tools to identify and manage risks in their routine practice. The tools are very basic and can be adapted to any level of practice. These tools will help the practitioner to identify the risks and to develop a contingency plan to control and manage risks. Approach:Two simple methods/ tools are explained in the presentation. First the ALARP model which determines the acceptance criteria of risks. The second tool a risk management process diagram which will help practitioners to identify various steps in risk management and its application by examples related to dentistry. Results/ recommendations: The presentation will provide practical tips and methods in healthcare risk management which are very simple tools to adapt in to the routine practices and will help greatly to improve patient safety and improve patient and clinician satisfaction.

Speaker
Biography:

Iveta Boroňová is a specialist in human genetics with sixteen years experiences in laboratory practice. She has completed her Ph.D. from University of Prešov in 2006 and habilitation in Anthropology from the same university in 2010. Her actual position is the Head of Department of Biology, Faculty of Humanities and Natural Sciences, University in Prešov, Slovakia. She is a member of European Cytogenetic Association and Anthropological companies. She is the author of monographs, textbooks and a wide range of original scientific papers in national and international journals and currently the field of her research activities is molecular genetics.

Abstract:

Tooth agenesis is a common development anomaly in humanswhich includes two types,syndromic or non-syndromic. Genetic and environmental factors may be of etiologic importance considered that complex interactions between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors caused dental anomalies.Several candidate genes associated with non-syndromic hypodontia have been described. In the current study we performed analyses of PAX9 gene in Slovak family with severe tooth agenesis. Genomic DNA was extracted from buccal swabs (Relia-Prep®, Promega). Sequence analysis was carried by ABI 3500xL Genetic Analyzer with terminator chemistry Big Dye3v1 (Applied Biosystems). Five exons, exon/intron junctions and UTRs of PAX9 gene were sequenced. Mutation detection was performed using reference sequence for PAX9 (GenBank NG_013357.1) available in NCBI database. In the analysed family we identified six polymorphismsof PAX9 gene. In 5UTR´ region cytosine insertion 99insC was detected in proband (III/1), brother (III/2) and father (II/1). In family members with cytosine insertion C272G substitution (rs4904155) was found. In coding region we detected the substitution of bases G1444C causes a change of amino acid alanine to proline (Ala240Pro) in three affected and one non-affected member in the analysed family. The silent mutation CAC→CAT (His239His) was observed in exon 4. In analysed members of the family we identified variants in 3´UTR region: a new variant G2452A and a rare variant G2307C (rs72679753). Identified variantsdetected in our study were not causal. The identification of causal mutations in hypodontia candidate genes should improve understanding of genetic basis of tooth development.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Jarmila Bernasovska studied biologyat Pavol Jozef Šafarik University in Košice, Slovakia. She is expert on molecular genetic methods, focusing on clinical genetics. Her research at University of Presovis focused on the analyses of mutations in candidate genes of selected genetic diseases in Slovak population including minorities. In the present time sheis director of Excellence Centre o fAnimal and Human Ecology. She has published more than 150 papers in reputed scientific journals and is the author of three monographs. She has long teaching experience and experience in laboratory medicine.

Abstract:

Hypodontia is agenesis of one to six teeth, and it represents the most common orofacial deformity in humans. The tooth development is very complicated and complex process. Research of the molecular basis of hypodontia is based on the detection of mutations in genes that affect the process of odontogenesis. Several candidate genes associated with isolated hypodontia have been described. The most common causes of hypodontia are mutations in transcription factors, such as the homeobox gene MSX1 and paired box gene PAX9. In this study, DNA samples of 19 patients, aged 9 to 25, with different types of tooth agenesis were analyzed. The agenesis of lateral incisors in the first and second quadrant has occurred more frequently (80,43%) than agenesis of second premolars present in the third and fourth quadrant (23,21%). On average, patients were missing two teeth. In one patient microdontia of lateral incisors in the first quadrant was present. In 52% of patients familial tooth missing (dental agenesis occurred in at least one of the two parents) was confirmed. Exons, exon/intron junctions and UTRs of MSX1 and PAX9 gene were sequenced in genomic DNA.Sequence analysis of candidate genes MSX1 and PAX9 showed the presence of several polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was isolated from buccal swabs. DNA sequence analysis was performed by the 24-capillary 3500xl Genetic Analyzer (Life Technologies). Sequences were evaluated by SeqScapeSoftware and Sequencing Analysis Software (Life Technologies) and compared with reference sequences. The detected variants have been described in relation to the pathogenesis of hypodontia. Key words : dental agenesis, hypodontia, MSX1, PAX9, sequence analysis

Speaker
Biography:

Teaching Assistant at Umm Al-Qura University, Faculty of Dentistry. Dental Intern at King AbdulAziz University, Academic Specialty Adviser at King AbdulAziz University, Metro Operation - Platform Agent at. King abdulaziz university faculty of dentistry. Dentistry graduate, passionate about oral and maxillofacial surgery

Abstract:

Assessing dental students’ personality types at King Abdulaziz University using Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Authors: Abeer Assiri, Maria Ibrahim, Mosaab Hawsawi Supervised by: Prof. Jamila Farsi Introduction: Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) instrument is one of the most widely used personality assessments in the world. In dentistry, several studies were conducted to assess personality types using MBTI for varied purposes. The primary objective of this study is to identify the most common personality types among second- and third-year undergraduate dental students at King Abdulaziz University using MBTI. Materials & Methods: Data for the study was collected through distributing self-reported questionnaire to the second- & third-year students in February 2013. The questionnaire was distributed to 261 students. The response rate was 84.29%. The age range was between 21 and 24 years. All participants were informed that they will remain anonymous and their answers will remain confidentially. Results: The most common personality types among dental students at KAU were ESTJ (15%), ISTJ (11.4%), ESFJ (10%), ISFJ (8.2%) & ENFJ (8.2%). (17.3%) of the female students had ESTJ personality type while 13.1% of the male students had ISTJ personality type. Conclusion: Personality types of the first & second year dental students at KAU were nearly the same as dental students in other countries. Knowing the most common personality types among the students may help the faculty members in choosing the best teaching methods for the students.

Break: Coffee Break @ Ball Room Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Mohamad Medawar is an endodontist, graduate of Saint Joseph University Beirut. He has completed his MBA Healthcare Management from La Sagesse University Beirut. His clinical work is restricted to endodontics; he is a former staff member of the department of endodontics in the Beirut Arab University . He is a dental management consultant. His field of interest and research is dental quality management and dental system reform.

Abstract:

Dentistry in the 21th century has become more efficient due to the great scientific and technological advances; clinical standards and treatments are the subject of continuous improvement leading to the enhancement in patient care. The adoption of recognized quality tools from manufacturing, services and healthcare industries will lead to a raise and improvement in the standard of the quality of dental care. The quality techniques and control methods are used to reduce variability in products or services, the cause of most quality problems. Quality follows a systematic sequence to transform the clients’ (patients) needs into requirements aiming for their satisfaction. The presentation will provide dentists with a basic understanding of quality and its application in dentistry; the following will be discussed: 1. Definition, aim, goal, aspects, concept and dimensions of quality 2. Definition and concepts of Total Quality Management (TQM) 3. Quality measurement: a) Indicators b) Process analysis tools: Brainstorming, Flowchart, Fishbone c) Process analysis tools application in dentistry (examples)

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her MBA(Human Resource) from SMU at 2010. She has completed her MDS, Public Health Dentistry Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore at 2007 Department of Public Health Dentistry, MCODS Mangalore Associate Professor at 2012 till date Department of Public Health Dentistry, MCODS Mangalore Reader at 2011-2012 Department of Public Health Dentistry, MCODS Mangalore Department of Public Health Dentistry, MCODS Mangalore at 2007-2011 Department of Public Health Dentistry, MCODS Mangalore Tutor at 1995-1996

Abstract:

Obtaining consent is not only an ethical obligation, but also a legal compulsion. Informed consent is more than simply getting a patient to sign a written consent form. But a major challenge posed was to assure subject's perception about the informed consent basic components, particularly among those with low educational attainment. This cross-sectional survey summarizes the perceptions of pregnant women with low educational attainment about informed consent while registering into randomized controlled trial in India.

Speaker
Biography:

Shikha has completed B.D.S at the age of 22years from Manipal University . She is an intern at Manipal College of Dental Sciences , Mangalore.

Abstract:

The quality of work carried out by dentists is dependenton knowledge,skill,experience, training, and manual dexterity. Most of the time,we ignore visual and interpretative deficiencies that could make individual acquisition of skills and interpretation of instructions difficult. The conviction that visual acuity has an essential influence on the precision of manual work in dentistry.However the idea ofmagnification devices should be used as standard devices in dentistry is relatively new. The present study will be carried with an aim to test the visual acuity and the influence of age on the visual acuity in dental personnelin a simulated clinical condition to evaluate the need of magnification devices. This cross sectional study will be conducted on a total of 105 dental personnel , over a range of age groups and 35 subjects (dental personnel) in each age group. Methods :Miniaturized visual tests using E-optotypeswill be performed in posterior teeth of a dental phantom head in a phantom head with operating lamp using dental mirror. The visual acuity of 105 subjects will be measured under the following conditions: (1) natural visual acuity, distance of 300 mm; (2) natural visual acuity, free choice of distance. Data will be analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 17.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago IL). Chi squareand Fisher’s exact tests will be used for comparison of categorical data. This is the ongoing study. The results will be given later.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohsen Maleki Gorji was born in Sari / Iran in 1989. He is currently a student of dentistry since 2008 in Islamic Azad University of Tehran/Iran. He presented in many national and international congress.

Abstract:

Objectives: Resin Infiltration Technique (RIT) has been suggested to prevent the progression of incipient caries and sealing the demineralized tooth structure. In this technique, 15% HCL is applied for 120 seconds to erode the enamel surface followed by application of a special resin to seal the demineralized parts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect 18% HCL, made in Iran on etching pattern of enamel and compare it with 15% HCL by SEM in different times. Materials and Methods: In this study, some extracted human anterior teeth were selected to provide sound enamel surfaces. Samples were randomly divided into the following groups; in G1 and G2 and G3: 15%HCL (Icon,DMG,Germany) was applied for 75s-90s-120s(Control) respectively. In G4 and G5 and G6: 18%HCL (Kimia, Iran) was applied for 75s-90s-120s respectively. The samples were prepared for SEM evaluation. The etching pattern and line scanning was evaluated and compared with significance of 0.05. Results: The mean demineralization depth was increased by increasing the time of application of both HCLs (18% & 15%). The depth of erosion in all 18% HCL groups was more than 15% HCL groups in the same application time. (P<0.05). In groups G3 and G4: There was not a significant difference in the mean of demineralization depth (P>0.05). Discussion & Conclusion: This research was done to determine that what time of application of 18% HCL acts the same as 15% HCL in 120 seconds. Because of the high cost of this product, it is not economic to use it as a treatment for post orthodontic decalcification (POD), so we decided to substitute the available HCL in Iran’s market for it.The results of this experimental study revealed that application of 18% HCL for 75 seconds acts the same as 15% HCL for 120 seconds.