Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Dental and Oral Health Dubai, UAE.

Day 2 :

  • Track 3: Oral Cancer
Location: Crown Plaza, Dubai
Speaker

Chair

Abdullah A. Faidhi

Saudi Society of Maxillofacial Surgery
Saudi Arabia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ashok Shenoy

Manipal University
India

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Jehad Al Sukhun is a Britsih / Jordanian oral and maxillofacial surgeon with a Master’s degree in oral and maxillofacial surgery from the University of Manchester and a PhD from the University of London in the United Kingdom. He has gained a number of fellowships and professional memberships in the United Kingdom and USA. During his PhD studies at the University of London, Dr Al-Sukhun obtained in-depth knowledge and experience in maxillofacial implantology and computer aided surgery using Finite Element Analysis. Prof. Al Sukhun has gained significant clinical experience in specialised dentistry, implantology, oncology, trauma, orthognathic surgery, reconstructive and cosmetic plastic surgery. He developed particular interest on the use of bioresorbable plates for reconstructing Mxillofacial defects. During his work in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, Prof. Al-Sukhun produced more than 40 papers published in an international peer review journals. He is an international speaker and lectured widely on reconstructive and plastic surgery. Prof. Al Sukhun sits on the editorial board of a number of well recognized journals in Oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Abstract:

Aim: To present several rare cases of cancer lesions of the mandible / maxilla, initially misdiagnosed and treated as a periapical lesion. Abstract: Periapical radiolucencies often suggest the presence of odontogenic pathosis, usually inflammatory granulomas or cysts. The high frequency of such lesions tends to lead clinicians to arrive at a diagnosis without completing a comprehensive assessment of the patient or carrying out the full range of available diagnostic tests. We present several rare cases of cancer lesions, which were misdiagnosed and treated initially as periapical lesions because of its unusual location and clinical manifestations.

Mohammed Gameel

University of Dammam
Saudi Arabia

Title: Prevention and early diagnosis of Oral Cancer
Speaker
Biography:

Mohammed Gameel is a specialist in Oral Medicine. He has graduated from the College of Dentistry, Liaquat Medical University in 1997. In 2005 he has completed his master\'s degree (MSc) in the specialty of Experimental Oral Medicine from King\'s college – London. He had worked for 5 years in the department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Leicester Royal Infirmary- UK. He had published several papers at international dental journals. currently he is working as a faculty in Dammam University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Cancer of the oral cavity is an important contributor to the overall international cancer burden. Oral cancer can usually be diagnosed at advanced stages. Lack of public awareness as well as absence of prevention and early detection by health care providers, are both believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay. Several studies have attempted to clarify which are the factors behind the diagnostic delay of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and why figures concerning prevention and early detection of Oral Cancer have remained disappointingly constant over recent decades. Lack of awareness in the public of the signs, symptoms, and risk factors of Oral Cancer, as well as a disappointing absence of prevention and early detection by health care providers, are both believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay. It is well established virtually that all Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas are preceded by visible changes in the oral mucosa, usually by way of white (leukoplakia) and red patches (erythroplakia). The prognostic implications of diagnosis and treatment of these early intra-epithelial oral carcinogenesis are highly significant due to high survival rates of early Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have stressed that we can reduce a third of the predicted 15 million cancer cases in the future and more effectively manage another third by planning effective cancer control and screening strategies.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Objective : Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a remarkable incidence over the world and a fairly strenuous prognosis, encouraging further research on the prognostic factors and new techniques for diagnosis that might modify disease outcome. A web-based search for all types of articles published was initiated using Medline/Pub Med, with the key words such as oral cancer, prognostic factors of oral cancer, diagnostic method of oral cancer and imaging techniques for diagnosis of oral cancer. The search was restricted to articles published in English, with no publication date restriction (last update April, 2013). In this review article, I approach the factors of prognosis of OSCC and the new advances in diagnostic technologies as well. I also reviewed available studies of the Tissue fluorescence spectroscopy and other non-invasive diagnostic aids for OSCC. The outcome is greatly influenced by the stage of the disease (especially TNM) (noguchi, 2002). Prognosis also depends or varies with tumour primary site, nodal involvement, tumour thickness, and the status of the surgical margins. There is an urgent need to devise critical diagnostic tools for early detection of oral dysplasia and malignancy that are practical, non-invasive and can be easily performed in an out-patient set-up. Tumour diameter is not the most accurate when compared to tumour thickness or depth of invasion, which can be related directly to prognosis. Tissue fluorescence spectroscopy is a reliable optical diagnostic biopsy. The use of FDG-PET scanning in diagnosis of lymph node involvement is controversial and There is a wide agreement in using of ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsies in evaluation of lymph node metastasis and it is considered as the most reliable technique.

Break: Lunch Break @ Al-Jumairah Ball Room Section 3
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Lamis abuhaloob obtained PhD in Dental Public Health from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom. She is Head of Oral and Dental School Health in Ministry of Health in Palestine. She published and presented several papers in national and international journals and conferences of dentistry.

Abstract:

Children in Gaza Strip (GS) suffer from a high prevalence of dental fluorosis and dental caries. This study aimed to determine the total fluoride intake (TFI) and Urinary fluoride Excretion (UFE) in 4-year-old children exposed to low, moderate or high fluoride in home tap water (<0.7, 0.7-1.2, >1.2 ppm respectively) in GS; to determine energy and nutrient intakes; and to make recommendations for preventive studies. A 3-day food diary, tap water, drinks, foods, toothbrushing expectorate and 24-hour urine samples were collected from 216 children receiving low (n=81), moderate (n=72) or high (n=63) fluoride in tap water. Fluoride concentration of samples was analyzed. A Food Tables Access Database was used to estimate energy and nutrients intake. Statistical analyses used ANOVA, Tukey\'s test and Pearson\'s Correlation. The mean TFI (±SD) in groups of low, moderate and high fluoride concentration in tap water was 0.02, 0.04 and 0.05 mg/kg body-weight/day respectively (P<0.0001). Foods made the largest contribution to TFI (63.85%). A negative relationship (P<0.0001) was found between Fractional UFE and intakes of protein, fat, fibre, carbohydrate and calcium. Children had low energy intake (5.17(±1.41) MJ/day). Non-Milk-Extrinsic (NME) sugars contribution to total energy was 12.2(+5.8)% and above the WHO recommended level (≤10% energy). Foods were the primary source of fluoride intake. Nutrients retarded fluoride absorption. High NME sugars intake increase the risk of dental caries. Thus preventive studies of dental fluorosis and dental caries should consider all fluoride sources, and encourage a balanced diet aiming to reduce NME sugars intake.

Speaker
Biography:

Ashwin Jawdekar graduated in 1997 and received master’s degree in Pediatric Dentistry in 2001 (both from University of Mumbai). He acquired MSc in Dental Public Health from KCL, and DDPH from RCS London, in 2012. He holds a PG Diploma in Hospital Administration (Medvarsity), PG Certificate in Dental Practice Management (University of Chester) and Certificate training in Clinical Dental Research Methods (University of Washington). He has international presentations and publications; authored a book, and contributed to textbooks. He received Tony Volpe Award of GCD Fund in 2013 at Harvard School of Dental Medicine. He possesses 11 years of teaching experience.

Abstract:

Income inequality hypothesis sustains that beyond a certain level of economic development, income inequality (the extent of uneven income distribution) is a stronger determinant of health than national income. Income inequality has been implicated in oral conditions like caries and periodontal diseases; but not sufficiently with oral cancers, although behaviours associated with oral cancer, namely smoking and alcohol abuse, result due to income disparities. This study explored the correlates of income, income inequality and oral cancer incidence and mortality in all and rich countries. Data on national income (GNI-PPP per capita), income inequality (Gini index) and oral cancer incidence and mortality (age-standardized rates) were from the World Development Indicators (2002), United Nations (2008) and GLOBOCAN (2008), respectively. Spearman’s correlation analyses were used as the data were non-normal. In all countries (n=120), GNI-PPP per capita was associated with oral cancer incidence (rho=0.33, p<0.001) but not with mortality (-0.02, p=0.818). Contrarily, Gini index was associated with oral cancer incidence (-0.36, p<0.001) and mortality (-0.32, p<0.001). In rich countries (n=22), neither GNI-PPP per capita nor Gini index were associated with oral cancer incidence or mortality (p>0.393). This study provided little support for the income inequality hypothesis in relation to oral cancer.

  • Track 4: Tools and techniques in dentistry
Location: Crown Plaza, Dubai
Speaker

Chair

Kiril Dinov

Di Nova Clinics
Bulgaria

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ramya Shenoy

Manipal University
India

Speaker
Biography:

Vicente Faus-Matoses is an Associate Professor at Valencia University (Spain) since 2009. Since 2007 he is a professor of the Master in Restorative dentistry and Endodontics and last year he became the director of the Diploma in Restorative and Esthetic dentistry at the same university. He also collaborates at Rey Juan Carlos University (Madrid) and is a known speaker in the field of dentistry in Spain. Since 2008 has published in reputed journals and received various international prizes for his research works. He is also the associated director of the Journal of Clinical and experimental Dentistry. He shares his private practice in Valencia (Spain) in an interdisciplinary dentistry team at Clinica Faus.

Abstract:

Patients aesthetic perception has been increasing bonded to the necessity of preserving their own healthy dental tissues. That is one of the main reasons why the dentists have to apply very conservative procedures during the aesthetic treatments. The knowledge of these conservative procedures ( sinergy between composites and ceramics used in the same tooth for a prepless restoration, direct composite full mouth rehabilitations, or full mouth prep less ceramic rehabilitations ) by the dentist will stablish the success of the restorative aesthetic treatment and the relation with our patients

Kiril Dinov

Di Nova Clinics
Bulgaria

Title: Occlusion-what ,or why,or how
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Dinov graduated in Medical University of Sofia in 1999 and Master Program in Implant Dentistry of UCLA. He is the main Lecturer in the Di Nova Educational Programs in Implant Dentistry and Occlusion. He is an active member of Global Institute of Dental Education. Winner of the Dawson Academy Award 2011.

Abstract:

There is nothing more important for the practicing dentist than the abilities to both recognize occlusal instability and achieve occlusal stability. The fundamental goal of every treatment planning is to achieve a result that will not cause breakdown in the masicatory system and to provide long-term stability.Working with all system components is the only way to achieve predictability and long term success in our daily work.Occlusion is the basis for everything a dentist does that involves teeth. A thorough understanding of occlusion is the corner stone for realising why teeth wear excessively, break cusps, fracture restorations, or shift position. Occlusal disharmony is a primary consideration when dealing with sore teeth, sore muscles, and orofacial pain, including a percentage of chronic tension headaches. Understanding meniscus misalignements and correct them using Splint therapy may be the only way to avoid surgery for many of our patients.Following a protocol of using different Splint designs combined with equillibration can be a safe and simple treatment,based on well known basic principles ,Anatomy of the Joint Jaw,Meniscus and Masticatory Muscles activity.The real role of the Anterior dentition as protector of the whole posterior dentition should be used in every Splint therapy to avoid continuous damage on every component of the system.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Sultan Aldeyab has completed his AEGD certificate with honor in 2008 , Then he got Saudi Board Of Restorative Dentistry with honor from 2008-2012. He is working in Restorative Department in King Abduaziz Medical City (National Guard) Riyadh, He is teaching restorative post graduate resident and lecturing undergraduate student in dental collage of King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. He got many awards and he has many publications and lectures.

Abstract:

Introduction: Esthetic outcome can be achieved, even in challenging clinical situations. The three pillars of such a successful outcome are knowledgeable and skillful dentist, properly selected materials and patient-dentist communication. Cases with discolored anterior teeth, Spaces, gummy smile in a high caries risk patients would be an example of such a challenges. Clinical Report: patients came to dental clinics at King Saud Medical City there chief complaint was restoring their teeth and enhance their smile,Diastema, Reverse smile,fluorosisteeth werediagnosed. These symptoms was found to be the reason behind unhappy masked facial expressions on their faces, Multiple decayed teeth and oral hygiene neglect were evident.A comprehensive treatment plan was implemented including extraction of badly decayed teeth, multiple root canal treatments, esthetic crown lengthening, implants, multiple restorations, and combination of bleaching and porcelain laminates and crowns. Treatment Objectives: • The multidisciplinary approach was oriented toward achieving functional and esthetic rehabilitation of the affected teeth. • Restore the patient’s smile, hence their self-esteem. Treatment Outcome: patients appreciated the result and they were happy with their new smile. Meticulous maintenance of oral hygiene needed. Conclusion: With proper strategic planning, an outstanding estheticoutcome can be achieved. Patients have to be treated as a whole, taking into account mental and social factors, rather than just the physical symptoms.

Break: Coffee Break @ Ball Room Foyer

Itziar Paz

National Health and Private service
UK

Title: The use of CBCT
Speaker
Biography:

Itziar Paz, born in North West of Spain in July of 1986, graduated in dentistry for European University of Madrid in 2009. She is currently working as a general dentist in the UK in National Health and Private service with special interest in Cosmetic and Restaurative dentistry , areas in which several courses has been taken.

Abstract:

The aim of this investigation is to demonstrate the key differences and benefits between the use of Conic Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) and Conventional Tomography. The contemporary use of CBCT allows us to obtain the essential information to recreate orthognathic surgery with unprecedented precision, which is accomplished through the observation of movements across both hard and soft tissue. CBCT also favours the correct mapping of the buccal bone structure, which is present in the routine panoramic radiographic examination. We believe several specialities would greatly benefit from the use of CBCT such as: maxillofacial surgery, periodontics, orthodontics and oral pathologists. In summary, the key differences between CBCT and Conventional Tomography are; a decrease in artefacts, superior resolution the absences of image distortion- leading to a more précised diagnosis which validates the development of this method of complementary exploration.

Cristina De La Torre

Universidad de Alfonso X el Sabio
Spain

Title: The use of CBCT
Speaker
Biography:

Cristina De La Torre, born in Huelva, Spain, in Octobre 1986. Finished the Dentistry degree in Universidad de Alfonso X el Sabio in Madrid and started working as an Orthodontist specialist in 2010. She has accomplished several courses in Cosmetic and Restaurative dentistry and currently. She has enrolled in a Master in Orthodontics.

Abstract:

The aim of this investigation is to demonstrate the key differences and benefits between the use of Conic Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) and Conventional Tomography. The contemporary use of CBCT allows us to obtain the essential information to recreate orthognathic surgery with unprecedented precision, which is accomplished through the observation of movements across both hard and soft tissue. CBCT also favours the correct mapping of the buccal bone structure, which is present in the routine panoramic radiographic examination. We believe several specialities would greatly benefit from the use of CBCT such as: maxillofacial surgery, periodontics, orthodontics and oral pathologists. In summary, the key differences between CBCT and Conventional Tomography are; a decrease in artefacts, superior resolution the absences of image distortion- leading to a more précised diagnosis which validates the development of this method of complementary exploration.

Speaker
Biography:

Nermin Kamal, (BDS) and Masters of Restorative dentistry (MSc); Cairo University, Egypt. Worked as a clinical tutor and course instructor in 6th October university; Egypt for two years. Then moved to Misr University for Science and Technology; Egypt for another year. Moved to Dubai; UAE to work in private sector and then Sharjah University; with the start of the implantology journey to become a member and a fellow of the AOIA (Alexandria Oral Implantology Association). Then a member, fellow and Diplomate of the ICOI (International Congress of Oral Implantolgists).A clinical instructor and in the scientific committee of the AOIA-SHARJAH implantology yearly course. A board member and the head of scientific committee of the Dubai Implantarium Congress. Lectured for the Ethics program and participating as a clinical supervisor in the IDSC (Implant Dentistry Study Consortium) in Dubai.

Abstract:

Narrow alveolar ridges remain a serious challenge for the successful endosseous implant placement. Among alveolar ridge augmentation techniques, the ridge-split procedure demonstrates many benefits, including no need for a second (donor) surgical site, uncommon risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury, and less pain and swelling, and others. Lateral bone augmentation through the ridge-split works best in a localized lateral bony defect intended for placing 1 or 2 implants and where the ridge is vertically intact. A combined surgical approach of mandiblar atrophic ridge utilizing one posterior vertical cut splitting; using rotary burs; and chisel, for the augmentation with allograft bone material; together with implant site expansion to accommodate a 4mm dental implant. An increase of 4 times of the original size of the bone has been achieved using this technique.

Speaker
Biography:

Manish Agrawal is a Consulting Prosthodontist & Implantologist. He did his Graduation and Postgraduation from Mumbai University India. He is a skilled Prosthodontist, very well known for his clinical skills. He is a Professor and Postgraduate teacher at Bharti Vidhypeeth University Pune India.He is a Director of Smile Dental Studio and Zenith Dental Laboratory. He excels in interdisciplinary dentistry, with Special emphasis on Full mouth rehabilitation & smile designing.

Abstract:

Diagnosis and treatment planning of a severely worn dentition are complex and complicated. This clinical report presents the result of increasing (restoring) vertical dimension with a full mouth restorative treatment procedure for a 56 year old female patient, who exhibits severe deep bite. Extra oral examination showed a reduction of lower facial height, wrinkles, drooping and over closed commissures. Intraoral examination showed old, worn out anterior and posterior restorations with anterior deep bite articulation and posterior severe attrition with loss of occlusal form and anatomy. A removable bite raising appliance was used to restore the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) in the first stage of rehabilitation. Diagnostic wax up was performed at the restored vertical dimension, provisional restorations were fabricated according to establish OVD which were used for three months as a guide for fabricating definitive restorations. During this period the adaptation of the patient to the restored OVD was evaluated following which definitive restorations were completed with the help of porcelain fused to metal (PFM) restorations in posteriors and zirconia based restorations in anteriors. Routine clinical assessments were made after one week, one month, three months and six monthly with visual and radiographic examinations.

Speaker
Biography:

She graduated from SDM College of Dental Sciences & Hospital, Manipal Academy of Higher Education.She is a reader at Singhad Dental College, Dental Surgeon at MOH hospital, Brunei Darussalam. She is the HOD at Amrita School of Dentistry.

Abstract:

Untill a few hundred years ago, very little was known about the electromagnetic spectrum except for light . Then, the discovery of infra-red radiation by William Herschel in 1800 led to further discoveries of radiowaves, microwaves and ultraviolet rays. However, it specific use for humanbeings did not get recognition until the discovery of X-rays by Roentgen. This was a milestone that found purpose in a variety of uses, besides medical or dental use. The part of the electromagnetic spectrum sandwiched between the microwave and infra-red region , known as the “terra hertz gap” comprises of the terra hertz rays or T-waves or T-rays. These radiations have frequencies in the range from 0.3THz to 10THz. The T-rays unlike X-rays is intrinsically safe, non-destructive and non-invasive and can be used as an imaging technique for characterizing molecular structures. T-rays enable three-dimensional imaging of structures and materials. Recent advances in technological development has led to further research in this part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Multiple applications ranging from investigating the molecular structure of drugs to distinguishing between different types of tissue in the body are currently in use. Terra hertz technology also helps in distinguishing between basal cell carcinoma and other forms of benign and malignant tissue growth in the skin and investigating the depth of the wounds. In the field of oral health care T-rays can be used to detect dental caries at an early stage. Conventional X-rays detect caries only when demineralization has progressed to such an extent that cavitation has occurred and restoration by cavity preparation is the only treatment modality. However, T-rays detect early decalcification of the enamel when it is possible to reverse the process by fissure sealant or fluoride application. In this review, the physics and applications of T-rays and the potential possibilities & application of these rays in human science are discussed.

Tasneem Al-Subaih

Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy
Saudi Arabia

Title: Gingival Zenith : A True Challenge
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Al-Subaih has completed her Bachelors degree in Dental Surgery from Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy. She is currently working as a teaching assistant in the restorative department at the same university. Dr. Tasneem and her research team were recently granted the second place in the research day of RCsDP.

Abstract:

The crafting of ideal smile requires analysis and evaluations of the face, lips, gingival tissues, and teeth and an appreciation of how they appear collectively. For as far as we remember, gingival zenith or what is termed as “Zenith Point” is considered to be a vital component in the smile analysis and esthetics. Zenith is defined as the most apical position of the cervical tooth margin where the gingiva is most scalloped. It is located slightly distal to the vertical line drawn down the center of the tooth. Establishing the proper location of zenith points is a critical step in alteration of mesial and distal dimensions. In this presentation we will briefly discuss the components of smile analysis, specifically the zenith point and then move into its importance in the dental field and lab work while elaborating it through several presented cases.

  • Track 5: Dental and Oral Health
    Track 6: Endodontics
    Track 7: Dental and Oral Abnormalities
    Track 8: Oral Health and Other Diseases
Location: Crown Plaza, Dubai
Speaker

Chair

M. Omer Gorduysus

Hacettepe University
Turkey

Speaker

Co-Chair

P. Elavenil

SRM University
India

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Dong Xie is currently Associate Professor at Department of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis. He obtained Ph.D. degree from The Ohio State University, School of Dentistry.

Abstract:

Background: Secondary caries is found to be the main reason to the restoration failure of dental restoratives. Secondary caries that often occurs at the interface between the restoration and the cavity preparation is primarily caused by demineralization of tooth structure due to invasion of plaque bacteria (acid-producing bacteria) such as Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) in the presence of fermentable carbohydrates. To make long-lasting restorations, the materials should be made antibacterial. Objective: The objective of this study was to synthesize new quaternary ammonium salt-containing oligomers, incorporate them to dental resin composites, and evaluate the effects of these new oligomers on the mechanical strength and antibacterial activity of the formed composites. Methods: The antibacterial oligomers were synthesized, characterized and incorporated into the resin composite. Compressive strength and S. mutans (an oral bacteria strain) viability were used to evaluate the mechanical strength and antibacterial activity of the formed experimental composites. The effects of the substitute chain length on the synthesized antibacterial oligomers, different oligomers, oligomer loading, and aging on strength and S. mutans viability of the composites were evaluated. Results: The results show that all the quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin composites showed significant antibacterial activity. Increasing chain length and loading significantly enhanced the antibacterial activity but also reduced the strength. The 30-day water-aging study showed that water did not reduce the antibacterial activity of the composite, implying that the antibacterial quaternary ammonium salt is not leachable. On the other hand, the incorporation of quaternary ammonium salt reduced the strength of the composite, suggesting that the quaternary ammonium salt loading should be well controlled so as not to compromise the mechanical strength of the composite.

Carol wells

Hamilton & District Dental Hygienists
USA

Title: The phase contrast microscope in dentistry
Speaker
Biography:

Carol Wells, graduated from Canadore College, North Bay, Ontario, Canada in 1977 with a degree in Dental Hygiene. Graduated with Honors from Expanded Duties Program Toronto Ontario, Canada in 1991. Carol worked in private practice from 1977 till 2007. During my career as a clinical dental hygienist I specialized in a Preventive Dental Hygiene Practice as a Periodontal Co-Therapist. My expertize was in Oral Systemic Health Link with the use Phase Contrast Microscope and the use of the acronym HONEST AGE.

Abstract:

The first phase contrast microscope was built in 1938 by Fritz Zernike, a Dutch physicist and mathematician. The advantage of the phase contrast microscope is to enable the viewing of live microorganisms, in their natural state. Periodontal Disease: Research shows us that Periodontal disease is related to different types of disease related bacteria that is able to survive in the oral cavity. Disease related bacteria in the oral cavity creates infection of the gums. Infected gums creates inflammation. Most illness in our bodies start with inflammation, from one source or another. This makes gum disease/ periodontal disease bi-directional. With the use of the phase contrast microscope, we can evaluate disease related anaerobic bacteria that is able to survive in the oral cavity and throughout our bodies. This creates the Oral Link to Systemic Illness. We will look at 5 different types of anaerobic bacteria and classify 3 different risk level of infection. A video will be provided to demonstrate how to take a bacterial slide and how to evaluate the different levels of disease related bacteria that can be seen with a phase contrast microscope. Periodontal disease is multi-factorial. I will discuss the acronym HONEST AGE. There is a need to understand how Oral Health and Overall Health is needed to be address not only in the dental setting but in a medical setting as well.

Hussam E. Najjar

Ministry of Health
Saudi Arabia

Title: “Dental Photography: The ABCs”
Speaker
Biography:

Hussam E. Najjar has completed his BDS at the age of 25 years from King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. He worked as a general dentist in Ministry of Defense then in Ministry of Health at Saudi Arabia. He is also a photographer interested in Portrait and landscape photography, he is interested also in using the different photography techniques within the field of dentistry.

Abstract:

In Order to assess the effectiveness of the treatment, we need to add to the patient file records and radiographs, intra and extra-oral photographs, here I’m going to talk about the ABCs of the intra oral dental photography, and what are the suitable cameras to buy and what settings are the most suitable for dental photography? What are the appropriate flash light settings? The technique is explained step by step, and also I’m going to talk about the post processing of photos and some common mistakes in dental photographs. The presentation starts by a brief introduction on how to buy your appropriate camera as the first step for a textbook quality photos.

Break: Lunch Break @ Al-Jumairah Ball Room Section 3
Biography:

Maryam Jameel a dental hygienist has completed master dual degree from University of Michigan , school of public health and dental hygiene program. Ms. Jameel is a trainer at the Evidence Base Practice in Jeddah , KSA. She is the quality designee at the dental administration and works as a member of the preventive committee team since 2002. She published an article about incorporating dental hygiene care in DH programs ( curriculum considerations) . Her second article was about engaging religion preachers in preventing public health problems in Saudi Arabia (on process).

Abstract:

The motivational interviewing is a structured intervention designed to motivate the patient. It is a client-centered, directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence .This approach is different from pressuring a person through threats of negative health consequences, shame, or guilt. The core communications skills of motivational interviewing-asking, informing, and listening are well suited to helping people talk about, commit to, and undertake health behavior change. Empathy, hope, and respect provide the foundation for what is possible in recovery from co-occurring disorders. That’s why practitioners show individuals that they are listening and understand issues from their perspective by using reflective statements. Conventional (health) education, focusing on disseminating information and giving normative advice, is insufficient to achieve sustained behavioral changes. A counseling approach, motivational interviewing (MI), is potentially useful in changing oral health behaviors. This presentation will present a tool for helping patients feel engaged and in control of their health and care. In addition, suggesting ways to guide and motivate parents on how to use their authority effectively to implement healthy family lifestyles

Speaker
Biography:

M. Omer Gorduysus (DDS, Ph.D., Professor) was born in Istanbul. He graduated from Hacettepe University, Faculty of Dentistry with the degree of DDS, completed his post-graduate program in Endodontics in the United States at the University of Southern California with the scholarship of Turkish Goverment and received the title of \"Specialist in Endodontics (1990-1992) later received his Ph.D. in Endodontics from Hacettepe University, Ankara-Turkey in 1993, went to ACTA of Amsterdam with the scholarship of the Goverment of the Netherlands (given by NUFFIC) in 1998, in the same year became Invited Professor and clinical instructor at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Endodontics in Canada (1998-2000). He studied in the field of research and has many publications in SCI covered besides the some local and international journals. His actual position is Professor at Hacettepe University, Faculty of Dentistry Department of Endodontics, convener of graduade endo program and editor in chief of “Clinical Dentistry and Research”, also giving national and international lectures.

Abstract:

We can define the population of the 21st century as “aging society”. Especially in recent decades, the life expectancy and the percentage of older population have been increasing impressively in the world. To provide elder people a good quality of endodontic therapy, to ensure them a better quality of oral health and overall to improve their life quality by saving their teeth with successful root canal therapy (RCT) is recently gaining importance in gerodontology. Geroendodontics is becoming one of the trendy topics and a promising sub-branch of endodontics. Working with the increasing number of the individuals of “aging society” brings new challenges in clinical applications and approaches during daily routine of an endodontist. Besides the clinical aspects the demographic, social and economical points of the subject are also crucial to emphasize. The purpose of this presentation is to emphasize and introduce demographic data about aging societies, background about geriatrics, physiological and histological changes in the pulp, teeth and mouth of older people, special clinical approaches to geriatric groups in endodontics, to discuss about clinical challenges, problems and their solving, treatment outcomes, potential clinical risks and the effects of their general health problems to their endodontic therapy, case selection, treatment planning and the clinical strategies, patient-doctor-family (and/or social workers, institutes) collaboration and coordination in line of the treatment of geriatric patients

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Humaira anjum has completed her masters degree from mumbai university in conservative dentistry & endodontics. She is practicing in clinical endodontics since last 16 years. She has taught as an assistant lecturer at govt.dental college & hospital.

Abstract:

A sample of 64 pellets of polycarboxylate cement & chemically activated composite resin- retrograde filling materials, was used to study the tissue response in albino rats of Wister strain. These materials were implanted in the subcutaneous tissue of 16 adult albino rats, equally distributed into 4 groups for various observation periods i.e.3,10,20 and 30days. Under G.A. using ether after preparation of the part,4 incisions were made and 2 pellets of each material were implanted below the skin and the wounds were sutured & post operatively the animals were observed. Healing was normal and uneventful. The animals were then sacrificed & the tissue spp.containing the pellets were obtained, fixed in formalin, dehydrated in graded ethyl alcohol, cleared in xylene,embedded in paraffin wax & bocks were prepared. Six micrometer thick sections were made & stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The stained sections were subjected to histological examination and the results were tabulated.

Ranjit Divakaran

King Hamad University Hospital
Bahrain

Title: Ego and Humility-its role in medical practice
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Ranjit Divakaran did his BDS and MDS (Maxillofacial Surgery) from University of Kerala, India after which obtained Fellowship (FDS RCS) from the Royal College of surgeon of England. Served in different capacities in India, UnitedKingdom and theMiddle East. At Presentworkingas consultant at King Hamad University Hospital, Bahrain. Attended many workshops and seminars in different aspects of self-development and purposeful thinking. Delivered presentation and talks in related topics both in India and Middle East countries, not just to medical people, but also to students and home makers. Authored a book that was recently published titled “Algebra of Hope”.

Abstract:

Medical profession is considered the noblest of all professions for it serves humanity by relieving or reducing pain: and that forms its core value. It was undoubtedly this passion that drove the youths of the yester generations into this profession of care and cure. With the major sweep of technological developments and the competitive commercialization, like in every field, has there been a distortion in its values? Has there been a dilution of the human touch to it.The answer to this is definitely yes, but the cause is not external, but deep within us. Amongst the multitude of human attributes, ego along with its misplaced awareness and misdirected energy is the prominent cause for this unfortunate dimension. Equally unfortunate is that, this same ego prevents us from identifying the problem, like a disease manifestation that prevents diagnosis.Egoisin is said to be the natural anesthetic that deadens the pain of beinga fool .The antidote for this has been proven to be humility. How can we balance these two attributes that are extremely contradictory? This presentations attempts to explain how to harness the power of our ego and that of humility to become better doctors, better human beings and greater achievers.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. P. Elavenil graduated from Ragas Dental College (BDS), Chennai and completed her post-graduate training in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery (MDS) from Meenakshiammal Dental College, affiliated to the Tamil Nadu Dr. MGR Medical University, Chennai (INDIA). She is presently holding an academic attachment as Reader in the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery at SRM Dental College, Ramapuram, SRM University, Chennai. Dr. P. Elavenil received the prestigious MM Cooper Memorial delegate research award in 2007. With a passion for teaching and research, she has published articles in reputed journals and is a memberof the Editorial board of SRM Journal of Dental Research.She has to her credit numerous presentations at national forums and is a contributor to a number of text books for undergraduate dental education. Her fields of interest includeFacial Trauma, TMJ surgery and Facial esthetic Surgery. She is currently involved in research on “prevention of Oro-facial clefts” and“novel biomaterials forhead and neck region”.

Abstract:

The incidence of non syndromic cleft lip and palate in the whole world is in the range of 1:500 to 1:2500 (1:500 in Asia,1:1000 in Europe,1:2500 in Africa). The occurrence of facial clefts not just disfigures the faceand deranges functionsof an individual; it mars the overall psychology of the patient.These patients have been traditionally managed by a myriad of corrective procedures which begin right from birth and continue till about twenty years of age ; Lip closure , Palate closure, VPI correction, Alveolar closure, interventional Orthodontics, Orthognathic surgery, Rhinoplasty, revision surgeries and rehabilitation which includes orthodontics, speech therapy & counselling. Nevertheless all are compromised and cannot guarantee complete restitution of the normal morphology or lifestyle of an affected individual. Every year huge sums of money is spenton corrective surgeries throughout the world.However,very less is channelized towards preventive measures.Thus there is a need for a global change in perspective in preventing such birth defects.Even today, the preventive aspect of cleft care is nascent. There is poor awareness even among professionals regarding the etiological elements involved in pathogenesis of facial clefts.The defect arising out of a complexinteraction of genetic as well as environmental factorsand complicated by ethnic and geographical variations,is still less explored. This paper aims to discuss the existing lacunae inthe care of cleft patients;focussing attention at achieving clarity in the pathogenesis of clefts so that it can be extrapolated to its prevention.

Sai Shamini

SRM University
India

Title: Bonding till the last drop ??
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sai Shamini did her Bachelors in Dental Surgery atRagas Dental College, Chennai,between 1995-2000. She had a brilliant academic record, during her under-graduate studies, winning several merit prizes / awards, in Oral Histology, Oral Pathology, Prosthetics and Orthodontics, for securing the highest marks, in the respective subjects.She was awarded the prize of the ‘Best Final Year Student’ for the Academic year 1998-99.She secured the III Rank in the TN State Post-graduate Entrance Examinations, held in 2001 andentered the haloed portals of the Tamil Nadu Government Dental College and Hospital, Chennai.She continued to shine academically, in her post-graduation studies, as well, specializing inConservative Dentistry &Endodontics.She was adjudged as the “Best Post Graduate Student”, awarded by FODI & IES, in the Year 2004.She has presented several scientific papers in National conferences, deliveredguest lectures in IDA Chennai.Recently, she has contributed two chapters for the textbook -“Materials used in Dentistry ” - Dr. S. Mahalakshmi. She is presently working as Reader,Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Madha Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, apart from having her own Private Practice, in Chennai.

Abstract:

Adhesive dental technology has revolutionized preventive, restorative and aesthetic treatment modalities. The science and chemistry behind dentin bonding agents is constantly researched to provide the best bond to dentin. Dentin presents challenges because of its intrinsic nature namely “wetness”, mixed organic-inorganic components and the presence of smear layer. The moist bonding technique with the etch and rinse adhesives is still practiced today with predictable success. This paper attempts to decode the components of the one –bottle dental adhesive system and addresses practical issues such as the efficacy of these components during its periodical usage in the clinics.

Break: Coffee Break @ Ball Room Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. S.Mythili has completed her Bachelor of Dental Surgery in the year 2000 from Sri Ramachandra Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India. Then she started her academic career as a Lecturer in the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Sri Ramachandra University from January 2001. Her passion for learning has made her pursue her Masters degree in the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology in the same institution from 2009-2012. She has attended many National and International conferences and delivered oral and poster presentations during her MDS degree course. Currently she is doing her Integrated MDS- PhD program awarded by the ICMR for the year 2009-2014 in the same institution.

Abstract:

Myocardial infarction is the major cause of death globally. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vascular disease characterized by the progression occlusion of blood vessels by the development of plaque growth. The ultimate result of interruption of the blood supply and oxygen to the myocardium due to occlusion is infarction which then leads to myocardial necrosis, followed by heart failure, myocardial rupture or arrhythmias. Diagnosing these disease conditions is becoming challenging and thus requires supplementing clinical evaluation with laboratory testing. Cardiac biomarkers are slowly replacing the traditional diagnostic methods for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. Cardiac troponins, creatine kinase- myocardial band and myoglobin are the routinely used biomarkers but their usage is limited because of their lack of appearance during the early hours. Heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) is an early biomarker of myocardial necrosis and injury. Levels of H-FABP are detectable in the blood as early as 2-3 hours and reach a peak concentration in about 6-8 hours. Laboratory diagnostic procedures analyze the cellular and chemical constituents of blood. Salivary diagnostics holds great promise as an effective alternate modality of blood for early diagnosis as it is non-invasive, easy to collect and economical. The aim of this study was to quantitate the levels of Heart fatty acid binding protein in the serum and saliva of patients with acute myocardial infarction. The results showed significant alterations in the levels of the protein in the serum and saliva of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

Speaker
Biography:

She completed both her B. D. S. and M. D. S. degrees from Government Dental College, Thiruvananthapuram. She has a combined work experience of over 12 years in clinics and academia and currently supervises postgraduate and undergraduate students in their research activities. Many of her students have won best paper awards at various state and national level conferences. Dr. Angel has published papers in national journals and has contributed two chapters in the Clinical Textbook of Medicine authored by Dr. K.V. Krishna Das. She was the editor for the special edition of the journal of Amrita School of Medicine and is also a peer reviewer of the journal of Amrita School of Medicine.

Abstract:

Hereditary gingival fibromatosis(HGF) is traditionally considered an autosomal dominant disease, characterized by a slowly progressive, benign enlargement of the keratinized oral gingival tissues that has been mapped to chromosome 2 or chromosome 5. HGF can also be found as a part of various syndromes. This paper highlights a case of hereditary gingival fibromatosis seen in a 11 year old girl. A detailed family history revealed gingival fibromatosis in mother and grandmother. They also had a history of multiple miscarriages. Karyotyping was done and a balanced translocation of chromosome 6 and 13 with break points on 6q21 and 13q34 was found in the child, mother and grandmother. Can this represent an entirely new syndrome?

Speaker
Biography:

Dr .Shady A. Moussa had received his Doctor of Dental Surgery in 2000 from Cairo University (Egypt) and his postgraduate Master of pediatric dentistry and oral public health from Al-Azhar University in 2006 and his PhD in pediatric dentistry and oral public health Al-Azhar University (Egypt) in 2012. He is a lecture in Zagazig University, and currently working as consultant of pediatric dentistry in King Saud Hospital (Saudi Arabia). Dr. Shady published several articles in peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract:

The dental environment is one of significant factor causing dental fear and anxiety. If the dental environment colors can precipitate a positive impact on the child’s behavior, then those colors may adapt more comfort and relaxation, thus reducing dental anxiety. Aim: To evaluate the association between colors and emotions of children in dental set-up based on heart rate. Design: A total of 250 children aged from 4-13 years were divided into 2 groups: (group I, 4-9 years, n=115) and (group II, 9-13 years, n=135). All the children were asked to shade two cartoon faces representing happiness and fear with their best preferred color. Each child’s heart rate was monitored during shading with a pulse oximeter that was clipped to the thumb of each child for 30 seconds. Results: The color preference for positive and negative emotion was compared based on their anxiety level by recording heart rates and age group. A total of 89 children (77.39%) of the group (I) were anxious and 26 children (22.6%) were non-anxious. 47 children (34.81%) of group (II) were anxious and 88 children (65.18%) were non-anxious. Dental anxiety was more in group (I) with significant difference than the group (II), P<0.05. Both anxious and nonanxious children preferred yellow followed by green and blue for positive emotion. However, in comparison by age, group (I) children preferred yellow significantly more and group (II) non anxious children preferred Green, P < 0.001. On the other hand, anxious and non-anxious children preferred red followed by grey and black for negative emotion. The color preference for negative emotion among anxious and non-anxious children in relation with their age group was statistically insignificant, P<0.001. Conclusion: The use of child’s preferred colors like yellow, Green and blue in the dental work place could enhance a positive attitude in the child’s mind during dental treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Nowadays, terms as transplant and chronic disease are beginning to be more commonly used in the everyday vocabulary of the general population. Renal disease is one of the chronic diseases with highest morbidity, and being that the most prevalent renal disease in the world is the chronic renal disease. It is also the one which requires the largest and most comprehensive care in health terms. The evolution of this pathology ultimately leads to renal transplant, for the patients that survive it and which their bodies can take the load of this kind of intervention. Before reaching this phase, the patient goes through several disease stages, although they may not have visible signs and symptoms, which leads to the disease remaining undiagnosed during long periods of time. When it becomes necessary to have renal substitution therapy, it is started by peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis. When the transplantation possibility occurs, even though it is not a cure, it brings along consequences and morbidities in numerous levels, largely due to the immunosuppressant medication. Periodontitis, being a chronic and multifactorial disease, has been linked to renal disease as one of the risk factors to its evolution. The inverse also occurs, and renal disease is one of the causes of a large number of alterations in the oral cavity. The best understanding of this bidirectional relation and its consequences could help in the promotion of a better oral health status in renal patients, as well as allow an early diagnosis of the renal disease, which will lead us, in a near future, to better expectations in the survival rates and decrease in morbidity in these patients. My presentation will have its main focus on a short but comprehensive explanation of Periodontitis, renal disease (since early stage until transplantation phase) and after which factors are common on the 2 diseases, in which way the treatment of each other can improve and/or influence in the outcome of one another.

Speaker
Biography:

IADR Lion Dental Research Award for Junior Investigators|IADR Neuroscience Group Young Investigator Award by Wiley-Blackwell Journal of Oral Rehabilitation. (IADR Group Award)|IADR BEHSR Student Abstract Award (IADR Group Award)|IADR Education Research Group Awards (IADR Group Award)

Abstract:

Neurofibromatosis type I (NF 1) is an autosomal dominant disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3500 individuals. NF1 exhibits multiple manifestations such as the presence of café-au-late spots, learning disabilities and bone deformities. A large proportion of NF 1 patients display skeletal deformities including alteration in bone size and shape, the presence of scoliosis, and tendency to develop pseudoarthroses. Although the skeletal manifestations of NF1 have long been recognized and studied but only recently recognized as skeletal dysplasia by bone researchers. Craniofacial abnormality occurs in about 7% of NF1 patients and characterized by hypoplasia or absence of greater wing of sphenoid bone. This dysplasia is progressive and always unilateral, results in bulging of one eye and mid-facial bone associated with malocclusion, and is termed Sphenoid Wing Dysplasia (SWD). We have established a breeding colony of neurofibromin (NF1 gene) osteoblast conditional knockout mice. Preliminary result indicate that the NF1ob-/- mice present with cranial asymmetry with eye bulging and malocclusion as the animal age. Micro-CT of these animals shows a progressive (12-24 weeks) loss of craniofacial symmetry at the sphenoid bone and other cranial bones. This phenotype is strikingly similar to SWD seen in NF1 patients. We propose to eliminate the possibility of tumor as a cause of facial deformity, by histological examination of numerous specimens and there by establish an osteoblast origin for the phenotype, to characterize the time course of the progression of craniofacial defect and to identify metrics to follow the progression of the phenotype, and to test the effect of treatment with diet, PTH and Ras antagonist on the development and progression of the phenotype. There are currently no treatment known that block or slow the progression of sphenoid wing dysplasia in NF1. Our ultimate goal is to identify the original cause of sphenoid wing dysplasia in NF1 and try to block or prevent such deformity, which will help the NF1 patients not to develop malocclusion and facial asymmetry.

SaimaQadir

Department of Oral Pathology
University of Health Sciences Lahore
Pakistan

Title: Oral mucosal changes in patients of HIV /AIDS taking antiretroviral therapy (art)in Pakistan
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. SaimaQadir is a postgraduate student of M.Phil in Oral Pathology at University of Health Sciences Lahore, Pakistan and has completed her MPhil Research thesis entitled \'\'Oral Mucosal Changes in Patients with HIV/AIDS With or Without Antiretroviral Therapy\'\'. She has, on her credit, two publications in reputed journals, one poster and one oral presentation of her research work at the Pakistan Association of Pathology Annual Conference 2013. Earlier, she acquired her Bachelors in Dental Surgery in 2008. She also worked as a junior lecturer in Punjab Medical College, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

Abstract:

HIV/AIDS is a growing epidemic in Pakistan. Oral lesions (OL) are a basic component and considered as a marker of disease progression and immunosupression1. Relevant data is very scanty and there is no cytomorphological study reported yet in our country. Oral smears, from n=35 patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART),were prepared and examined microscopically using H&E, PAS and Papanicolaou stain. CD4+ lymphocyte count was determined using flow cytometry. Latest plasma viral load levels were recorded from the patient`s updated laboratory record and patients were clinicallyexamined and staged according to WHO staging system2 Mean age of the patients was 40.71± 11.8 years. Most of the patients (77.1%)were males with M:Fof 3.4:1. A total of 85.7% patients presented with WHO clinical stage 1, 5.7% each in clinical stage 2 and 3 while 2.9% in clinical stage 4. Oral lesions were present in 63% of the patients with oral pigmentation in 45.7%, chronic periodontitis in 20%, linear gingival erythema in 2.9%, pseudomembranous candidiasis, oral ulcersand xerostomia each in 5.7% caseswhile mucositis, oral hairy leukoplakiaand oral wart each in 2.9% cases. On cytological examination, fungi were detected in 68% smears with Candidiasis being the commonest followed by Cryptococcus. Inflammation was seen in 65.7% smears, micronuclei in 51.4%, nuclear atypia in 37.1% and dysplastic changes in 17.1% (grade 1 in 83.3% and grade 2 in 17%)smears. Frequency of these cytological changes increased with the increasing clinical stage. The mean CD4+ lymphocyte count was 381.20 ±214 cells/mm3. CD4+ lymphocyte count was grouped as <350 cells/mm3 (Group 1) and >350 cells/mm3 (Group 2). Group 1 comprised of n=22 while Group 2 had n=13 patients.Most of the oral lesions were seen in CD4+ Group1 with smears showing fungi (p=0.01) and micronuclei (p=0.03) being significantly associated with this group.Mean viral load was 42025 ±150920 copies/mm3with no significant association withclinicocytological variables. Many practitioners as well as patients are not aware of the importance of oral manifestations including the dysplastic ones, in HIV positive patients taking ART in our country. This study not only highlights the preventive aspects needed to improve the oral healthwhich in turn enhances quality of life as well as compliance to drug therapy in these patients.

Speaker
Biography:

She is an Assistant Professor of Endodontics at GMU, Ajman, UAE. She was a lecturer at the Department of Endodontics Faculty of Dentistry, Suez Canal University, Egypt. She got her Bachelor of Oral Surgery & Dental Medicine (BDS), Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt in 1996. In 2003, she had her Master Degree in Conservative Dentistry (Endodontics) (MSc), Faculty of Dentistry, Suez Canal University, Egypt. Subsequently, she got her Doctoral Degree in Dental Sciences (Endodontics) (DDSc), Faculty of Dentistry, and Suez Canal University, Egypt in 2009. She is a member of many of the dental associations. She has several publications. She shared in various conferences as a speaker as well as a chairperson.

Abstract:

The main objective of performing root canal therapy is to eliminate bacteria from the infected root canal system or remove inflamed pulp tissue and close it with a biologically acceptable filling material. If this treatment well accomplished, regardless of the number of visits, it will create a favorable environment for healing. The recent advances in Endodontic technology attractdental practitioners as well as Endodontists to perform root canal treatment in one visit.One-visit endodontic treatment offers some potential advantages for both clinician and patient. In addition to being faster and very well accepted by patients, it may prevent the risks of root canal system contamination or recontamination between the clinical appointments.However, treatment in one session of necrotic pulps associated with periradicular lesions remains one of the most controversial issues in endodontics.In the presentation, indications and contraindications of single visit root canal treatment for cases with apical periodontitis will be discussed. Furthermore, the appropriate treatment for apical periodontitis will be mentioned.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sohaib Hassan received his BDS degree from Margalla Institute of Health Sciences, Rawalpindi, Pakistan in 2009 and awarded “Distinction” in Orthodontics by University of Health Sciences (UHS), Lahore, Pakistan. He has, on his credit, published 2 papers in reputed indexed journals and few are under review. He has presented his research work on various national and international forums. Currently, He is working as a chief resident in Orthodontics Residency Program at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan.

Abstract:

Objective: To compare skeletal maturity stages and mean dental ages in patients with impacted versus erupted maxillary canines through radiographs. Materials and Methods: It was a case control study with a total number of 50 cases and 50 controls. The inclusion criteria were patients of chronologic age 13-16 years, cases with unerupted maxillary canines and controls with erupted maxillary canines. Dental age and skeletal maturity stages were recorded from pretreatment OPG and lateral cephalometric radiographs, respectively. To control the confounders, cases were matched with the controls on the basis of chronologic age, gender and vertical skeletal pattern. Results: Independent sample t-test showed statistically significant difference (p = 0.000) between mean dental ages of cases (11.35 ± 0.47years) and controls (13.17 ± 1.08 years). Chi-Square test also showed statistically significant difference (p = 0.01) of frequency distribution of skeletal maturity stages between cases and controls [CS1 (04%, 00%), CS2 (08%, 00%), CS3 (28%, 04%), CS4 (16%, 30%), CS5 (34%, 46%), CS6 (10%, 20%)], respectively. Conclusions: Mean dental age was found to be significantly reduced in patients with impacted maxillary canines as compared to patients with erupted maxillary canines. Cervical vertebrae maturation was found to be significantly retarded in patients with impacted maxillary canines as compared to patients with erupted maxillary canines. Keywords: Impacted maxillary canines, cervical vertebrae maturation stages, dental age

Break: Poster Presentations @ Ball Room Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Mohyman Sarfraz is a postgraduate student of M.Phil in Oral Pathology at University of Health Sciences Lahore, Pakistan and is working on his MPhil Research thesis titled 'Oral Cytopathological changes in Snuff Dippers''. Earlier, he acquired his Bachelors in Dental Surgery in 2008. He also worked as a lecturer in Punjab Medical College, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

Abstract:

Dipping tobacco, traditionally known as moist/wet snuff, is a type of finely ground or shredded, moistened smokeless tobacco product. The easy availability, low cost and lack of awareness of its negative impact on health increases its consumption. Snuff induced oral lesions including leukoplakia, snuff dippers keratosis, epithelial dysplasia and even carcinoma etc. occur at the site where snuff is usually placed. This study was therefore designed to observe and record the cytopathological changes in the oral cavity in habitual wet snuff users. Oral smearswere prepared from n=100male patients takingwet snuff for at least 1 year and having clinically detectable oral lesions. Smears were examined microscopically using H&E,Giemsa, Papanicolaouand PAS stains. Cases were grouped according to age[<30 years (43%) and >30 years(57%)], dose of snuff taken [mild (16%), moderate (45%) and heavy (39%)] and duration of usage [<5 years (54%), 5-10 years (41%) and >10 years(5%)]. Mean age was 42.51± 13.8 years. Oral lesions were present in 73% cases with snuff dippers keratosis seen in all (100%) followed by erythroplakia (73%), gingivitis (62%), chronic periodontitis (35%), white plaque (31%), oral pigmentation andmucositis(12% each). On cytological examination, inflammationwas observed in42% (41% acute, 1% chronic) smears, nuclear atypia in 37%,micronuclei in 30%, Candidiasis in 14%and dysplastic changes in 4% (all grade 1) smears. With the increasing age(<30 years vs > 30 years), increased frequency of these cytological changes, particularly nuclear atypia (48.6% vs 51.4%) and dysplasia(25% vs 75%) was found. When clinic-cytological variables were compared, nuclear atypiawas significantly associated with the dose of snuff (p=0.000), duration of snuff usage (p=0.001), periodontitis (p=0.032) and micronuclei (p=0.012). Similarly, a significant association between dysplasia and dose of snuff (p=0.021), white plaque (p=0.008) and inflammation (p=0.026) was observed. Most of the habitual dipping tobacco users in our country are unaware of the implications of oral manifestations including the dysplastic ones occurring because of this addiction. Routine screening and early detection of such mucosal changes will improve the clinical outcome.Also there is a dire need to draft and enforce national policy and regulations for snuff usage and its manufacturing creating provisions of adequately tested material.