Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Dental and Oral Health Dubai, UAE.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Sammy Noumbissi

International Academy of Ceremic Implantology, USA

Keynote: All Ceramic Implantology with Zirconia Dental Implants: Rationale, Case Selection, Treatment Planning and Clinical outcomes

Time : 10:35-11:00

OMICS International Dental-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sammy Noumbissi photo
Biography:

Sammy Noumbissi obtained his Doctorate in Dental Surgery from Howard University in Washington DC. He then attended Loma Linda University where he received three years of formal training in Implant Dentistry which culminated with a certificate and a Master of Science degree in Implant Dentistry. He has published abstracts and articles in peer reviewed dental journals namely the Journal of Dental Research, the Journal of Oral Implantology and the Journal of Implant and Clinical Dentistry. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Implant and Advanced Clinical Dentistry, the Dentistry and Medical Online Journal, a reviewer for the Journal of Oral Implantology and the current president for the International Academy of Ceramic Implantology. Dr. Noumbissi is the founder, current owner and president of Miles of Smiles Institute for Implant Dentistry LLC, a holistic dental implantology practice that delivers advanced education and patient care in state of the art metal-free dental implantology. He practices in Silver Spring, Maryland USA.

Abstract:

Following in the footsteps of medical orthopedics, the last decade has seen zirconia the tetragonal crystal phase of zirconium become an acceptable and proven material of choice in dentistry. Zirconia abutments on metal implants have been widely used especially when aesthetics are of concern mainly because of the exceptional soft tissue response. Reaseach is increasingly proving that not all patients are physiologically able to accept or tolerate metal implants as such the search for an alternative to titanium and titanium alloy implants has been active for over twenty years. Bioceramics such as Y-TZP Zirconia have emerged as the alternative of choice in dental implantology. Zirconia is an inert bioceramic which has excellent biomechanical properties, does not conduct heat, retains no plaque and it is not susceptible to galvanic activity or corrosion in the oral environment. Most ceramic implants today are one-piece therefore case planning, surgical technique, post-surgical monitoring, restorative options and materials are critical for long term case success. This presentation will first cover zirconia as an implant material and the reasons why and instances when it should be the material of choice for implantation. Second through clinical case presentations decision trees on case selection, treatment planning and surgical protocol will be presented.

Keynote Forum

Dave Singh

BioModeling Solutions, USA

Keynote: Changes in 3D nasal volume after biomimetic oral appliance therapy in adults

Time : 11:00-11:25

OMICS International Dental-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dave Singh  photo
Biography:

G. Dave Singh was born, educated and trained in England. He is currently Chairman of BioModeling Solutions, USA. Previously, he was a Visiting Professor in Orthodontics (Malaysia and Indonesia), Associate Professor at the University of Puerto Rico, USA, and Director of Continuing Education, SMILE Foundation, USA. He has been published extensively in the orthodontic and dental literature, and has co-authored several books. He is also Senior Instructor/Consultant/Fellow of the International Association for Orthodontics; Academic Fellow of the World Federation of Orthodontists; and a Member of the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine.

Abstract:

Introduction: Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is recommended as the first line of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, patient compliance is often the limiting factor in terms of treatment success. Poor compliance may be a consequence of nasal obstruction, which requires higher CPAP pressures to overcome nasal resistance. Indeed, if the nasal airway volume could be increased, patient compliance with CPAP might be improved. Therefore, in this preliminary study we investigated 3D changes in nasal volume, to test the null hypothesis that nasal cavity volume cannot be changed in non-growing adults. Methods: After obtaining informed consent, we undertook 3D cone-beam computerized axial scans of 11 consecutive, adult patients (mean age 37.9 yrs) prior to and after biomimetic, oral appliance therapy. These cases had all been diagnosed with midfacial underdevelopment. The mean treatment time was 18.4 months ± 2.5. Volumetric reconstruction of the nasal cavity was undertaken between the anterior and posterior nasal spines, extending superiorly from the palatine process of the maxilla and the palatine bone to the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone. Next, the nasal cavity volume was calculated in all cases. The findings were subjected to statistical analysis, using paired t-tests. Results: The mean nasal cavity volume was 41.9cm3 ± 12.1 prior to treatment. After oral appliance therapy, the mean nasal cavity volume increased to 44.0cm3 ± 12.1 (p = 0.022). Conclusions: These data support the notion that nasal cavity volume can be changed in non-growing adults. Therefore, use of a biomimetic oral appliance prior to, or in conjunction with, CPAP therapy might potentially improve CPAP compliance in adults diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea by increasing the nasal cavity volume and decreasing nasal airflow resistance. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\n

Keynote Forum

Ninian Peckitt

Nicolas and Asp Center
European University College
UAE

Keynote: Engineering Assisted Surgery™ - The Gold Standard in Personalised Care

Time : 11:00-11:25

OMICS International Dental-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ninian Peckitt photo
Biography:

Ninian Peckitt has worked in this research area for 20 years and has an international reputation in this area of expertise. His lectures employ sophisticated multi-media technology to describe the planning and management of cases, some of which are very complex. In this lecture, the reconstruction of the entire midface, including the dentition, is demonstrated as a day case procedure in a surgical procedure lasting only 90 mins. He regularly lectures by invitation and is moving his Training and Research base to the European University College, and his clinical practice to the Nicolas and Asp Clinic, in Dubai.

Abstract:

Successful clinical interventions rely heavily on human qualities of the clinician, and an association with inaccurate replication and transfer of 2-D treatment plans into patients with three dimensions. Modern Healthcare is the only and last High Tech Industry which still depends on human frailty and the manual skills of its workforce – skill requirements that have long been abandoned by sister industries. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nEngineering Assisted Surgery™ (EAS) is defined as “the application of industrial and engineering systems to health care delivery” with respect to existing interventions and new/evolving surgical procedures, across a range of specialities.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nEAS has important applications related to current surgical practice, and the recent introduction of additive manufacturing, permits mass production of both standard and customised medical devices/implants at much lower cost, and is set to revolutionise surgical practice. It is predicted that customisation will become the norm in personalised healthcare programmes within the next decade.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nHealthcare is in the perfect position to benefit from these advances made by adopting customisation, and in particular additive manufacturing technologies, to support the surgeons in delivering improved and consistent outcomes for patients.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nEAS heralds new gold standards in the provision of global healthcare, with an improvement in efficiency, quality and outcome, already seen in other industries, and not only promotes the concept of best practice; it makes best practice a reality.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nThe value of an industrial contribution to healthcare modernisation has been now internationally recognised. However, such a process can only be effectively implemented within EAS Training Centres of Excellence, and in partnership with concomitant reforms in healthcare policy, funding, management and delivery.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\nEAS™ provides an evidence based and efficacious industrial model on which to build modernised healthcare systems, which are currently under so much pressure, and therefore such programmes require utmost priority.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\n

Keynote Forum

James L. Ratcliff

Rowpar Pharmaceuticals
USA

Keynote: Time’s arrow in the treatment of oral and systemic disease

Time : 10:35-11:00

OMICS International Dental-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker James L. Ratcliff photo
Biography:

James L Ratcliff is Chairman and CEO of Rowpar Pharmaceuticals, Scottsdale, AZ, makers of the ClōSYS and Dentists’ Choice brands of oral care products. Prior to assuming his current role, he was Professor and senior Scientist at the Center for Higher Education at the Pennsylvania State University (1990-2000), Professor of higher education at the Iowa State University (1979-1989), President of Performance Associates Consultants (1976 to present), Associate Professor, Florida Atlantic University (1977-1978) and Assistant Professor, Washington State University (1975-77). He is author of over two dozen books and over hundred articles and has consulted with universities, research centers and higher education agencies on six continents. He is co-inventor with Elena Young of a patent application entitled, “Method for prevention and treatment of oral fungal infections”.

Abstract:

What does research into patient behavior and home oral care products teach us about the role of time and timing in patient treatment protocols? Drawing on product development research and consumer research, Dr. Ratcliff examines the intersection between dental treatment and prevention protocols, patient home oral care practices, and the selection of chemotherapeutic agents in therapy and prevention, challenging conventions in patient treatment protocols and home oral care. The influence of commercial advertising on patient expectations and professional practices are also discussed, as well as the role of the dental professional in improving patient outcomes. The implications and findings of research and theory for patient treatment protocols for oral disease, patient education, and home oral care practices are presented.

Break: Coffee Break @ Ball Room Foyer

Keynote Forum

Isabel Rambob

University of Maryland School of Dentistry
USA

Keynote: HIV, TB & smoking

Time : 11:00-11:25

OMICS International Dental-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Isabel Rambob photo
Biography:

Isabel Rambob received her Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from the State University of Feira de Santana, Brazil in 1997. She completed a one-year program in Advanced Education in Comprehensive Dentistry at New York University College of Dentistry in 2007. She then pursued and completed a one-year Residency Program in Advanced Education in General Dentistry at Howard University College of Dentistry in 2008. She was a dental provider at HIV+ clinic and a clinical instructor at Special Needs clinic at University of Maryland School of Dentistry from 2009-2012. She was the dental director at National Minority AIDS Education and Training Center from 2009-2010. She was a HIV/AIDS & oral health preceptor at Howard University College of Medicine from 2009-2010. She was the dental director at Health Care for the Homeless, Maryland from 2010-2011. Currently, she is an assistant Professor at University of Maryland School of Dentistry at the Department of General Dentistry. She is also a guest lecturer at New York University College of Dentistry, Howard University College of Dentistry and VA Medical Center, Baltimore. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\n\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\n

Abstract:

Since the beginning of the 21st century, we are facing the convergence of several epidemics. These include tobacco smoking, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV infection. These epidemics interact by way of increasing disease susceptibility and worsening outcomes. To control these interacting epidemics, it is crucial to better understand each infection and how it influences the others. The association between tobacco smoke and TB was suggested many years ago. Evidence of the impact of tobacco smoking on TB infection has been confounded by its almost universal association with poverty, overcrowding and alcohol usage. Similar pathological mechanisms induced by malnutrition, alcohol abuse and smoking may indeed all predispose an individual to TB. Although both tobacco smoking and HIV infection may be associated through their common associations with poverty and high-risk behavior, tobacco smoking appears to be an independent and important risk factor for contracting HIV. Smoking further raises the extremely high risk of contracting TB in HIV+ individuals. The overall goal of this presentation is to focus on HIV disease, TB and smoking in their impact on the oral health. Tobacco use in HIV+ smokers is responsible for increased periodontal disease and tooth loss. Also HIV+ smokers have an increased incidence of cancer of the larynx, pharynx and esophagus. Smokers have an increased risk of oral candidiasis and oral leukoplakia, as well as decreasing healing of oral lesions. There is a marked risk of oral cancer in tobacco users and more than 80% is squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore dental professionals should play an important role in preventing these epidemics. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\n

  • Track 1: Therapy and Treatment
Location: Crown Plaza, Dubai
Speaker

Chair

Anas Al-Mulla

European University College
UAE

Speaker

Co-Chair

Hani T. Fadel

Taibah University College of Dentistry
Saudi Arabia

Session Introduction

Anas Al-Mulla

Nicolas and Asp Center
European University College
UAE

Title: Solving the Puzzle of Caries Risk and Prevention in Orthodontic Patients

Time : 11:25-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Al-Mulla is an Assistant Professor and Director of GCC Affairs at the European University College (formerly Nicolas Asp University College) in Dubai, UAE. He received his dental degree in 2003 from King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and his Specialty in Orthodontics and Masters in Cariology in 2009 from University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; a Ph.D degree in Cariology was awarded from the same university in 2010. Dr. Al-Mulla is an orthodontist specialist with expertise in cariology; his scholarly publications reflect his special interest in caries risk and prevention in orthodontic patients. He is a reviewer in few orthodontic profession journals, such as American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Angle Orthodontics, Orthodontics - The art and practice of dentofacial enhancement (formerly World Journal of Orthodontics) and European Journal of Orthodontics.

Abstract:

The human oral cavity is a complex ecosystem, inhabited by more than 300 bacterial species. The risk of developing caries lesion around brackets during orthodontic treatment is high. Caries affects individuals differently, which makes it essential that those at the highest risk are identified early. There appears to be a correlation between the fluoride concentration of dentifrices, rinsing method after tooth brushing and caries prevention. The puzzling complexity of how to identify patients with high risk to develop caries, what are the new ways to reduce the risk and how to illustrate it to patients in the clinic will be discussed in this lecture. Learning Objectives: At the end of the session, the participant should be able to do the following: 1. Be aware of the past, present & future of evidenced based caries risk and prevention literature. 2. Be familiar with the “Cariogram”, a free caries risk computer program. 3. Have the ability to identify those patients with low, medium and high caries risk. 4. Understand the effect of 5000 ppm Fluoride toothpaste on caries. 5. Reduce caries risk in their patients significantly by following the Modified Fluoride Toothpaste Technique (MFTT).

Hani T. Fadel

Taibah University College of Dentistry, Saudi Arabia

Title: Evidence-based management of complications following periodontal and implant therapy

Time : 11:45-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

Hani T. Fadel obtained his clinical certificate in Periodontology and his Ph.D. from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. He is currently Assistant Professor of Periodontology at the Taibah University College of Dentistry in Madinah, Saudi Arabia, where he serves as Assistant Vice Dean for Academic Affairs alongside other administrative appointments. Dr. Fadel published several articles in peer-reviewed journals. He currently serves as Editor for the American Journal of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene and Journal of the Indian Society of Periodontology. He is also an External Reviewer for a number of journals, including Journal of Periodontology, European Journal of Oral Sciences and Oral Diseases.

Abstract:

Treatment of periodontal disease, both non-surgical and surgical approaches, aims at 1) improving the periodontal status mainly by controlling local etiological factors and systemic contributory factors, and 2) maintaining the periodontal condition in a healthy state. Certain complications following periodontal treatment have been associated with the progression of the disease, are of major concern to the dentist and may in fact jeopardize the success of any performed oral rehabilitation procedures. Similarly, complications following implant therapy have been reported, particularly biological complications involving the peri-implant tissues, which may also affect the success rates of dental implants. This presentation will give an overview of the available evidence concerning complications following periodontal and implant therapy, and will propose some modern strategies on how to reduce the chances of occurrence of such complications.

Crawford Bain

Dubai School of Dental Medicine, UAE

Title: Sinus avoidance keeping implant dentistry simple
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The gradual expansion of the maxillary sinus and ridge resorption after tooth loss, can limit the remaining available bone for possible implant placement. Since the 1980’s techniques to increase posterior maxillary bone by sinus grafting have developed, allowing implant placement where bone was deficient. However a combination of higher success rates with short rough surface implants and modifications of surgical techniques requires us to reassess the widespread use of sinus grafting. It is the purpose of this talk to present the argument that the need for sinus grafting has become much more limited, and its overuse exposes the patient to unnecessary additional surgical procedures, morbidity, risks and costs, as well as often extending total treatment time. Various novel surgical and restorative solutions to deficient posterior maxillary bone will be presented and discussed.

Break: Lunch Break @ Al-Jumairah Ball Room Section 3

Nicola Barabanti

Italian Academy of Esthetic Dentistry
Italy

Title: New prespective and excellence in restoring posterior teeth
Speaker
Biography:

Nicola Barabanti graduated in Dentistry at the University of Brescia in October 2004 with honors, tutor of Conservative Dentistry since 2005 at University of Brescia. He is the invited professor in the University of Valencia (Spain) and Pisa (Italy). He is the author of several papers and posters on the themes of Adhesive Dentistry on National and International Magazines. He is the active member of IAED , SIDOC and founding member of BNM. He works in his private offices applying mostly in Adhesive and Esthetic Dentistry.

Abstract:

The desire for an invisible restoration causes the patient , now with greater frequency , to require the use of aesthetic material also in the posterior teeth. These materials, as the adhesives, are highly conservative and must be considered a safe therapeutic choice, both for vital and endodontically treated teeth Today it is possible to reconstruct also the severely compromised elements with composite inlays The aim of the lecture is to illustrate the characteristics of goods, provide the technological basis and updated clinical , which may lead to a critical knowledge and targeted materials proposed by the market. In the lecture all the procedures will be summarized and then demonstrated through the presentation of some clinical cases, with video and 3D movies , giving suggestions for the clinical success and predictability of the results. We will analyze the correct guidelines to indirect restorations in posterior teeth , the possibilities of use and clinical sequences of the latest techniques for the adhesive restorations.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Eman Arnout is Oral & Maxillofacial Radiologist assistant professor at Taibah University, Madinah, KSA / Ain- Shams University Cairo, Egypt. She was finished her PhD in University of Minnesota , USA which was a joint supervision grant offered by Ain- Shams University . She is the Director of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology clinic at Taibah University. Dr. Arnout research interest include evaluation of osteoporosis, Conception of norms TMJ radiographic classification from cone beam computed tomography of adult and children & Biological hazard of X-ray. She has several published article in National and International Journals.

Abstract:

Purpose: To investigate the influence of different gamma irradiation doses on the bond strength to enamel and dentine using two different bonding systems. Materials & Methods: flat enamel and dentin surfaces on human premolars were obtained and cylindrical-shaped specimens for the microshear bond strength were built up with Two types of commercially available adhesive systems which have been used in the study along with two resin composites: Filtek 250 XT nanohybrid with Etch and rinse adhesive system (Adper Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose) and Filtek LS Low Shrink Posterior composite with LS System Adhesive Self-Etch Primer & Bond. The specimens were assigned to 2 groups (n=20), according to the x-ray dose: 35 or 70 Grays (Gy). Radiation was directed to the surface of the resin cylinders. Microshear testing was conducted within one week for bond strength. Data were submitted to three way-ANOVA and Tukay post-hoc test were used when the ANOVA was significant. Independent t-test was used to study the effect of radiation dosage for each group. Results: Bond strength results were dose, material and substrate dependent. 70 GY irradiation dosages produced a significant reduction on micro-shear bond strength compared to 35 GY. Moreover, total etch adhesive system SB produced significant higher values for Micro-Shear bond strength compared to Self-etch LS. Also Enamel produced the highest mean micro-shear bond strength compared to dentine. Conclusion: Irradiation presents a dose-dependent detrimental effect on the bond strength of resin composite to both enamel and dentin. KEYWORDS: Irradiation doses, Resin Composite, Adhesive systems, Bond strength, Enamel

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to quantify dental plaque retention on tooth surface around different types of orthodontic brackets using ATP bioluminescence measurement technique. Methods: the sample consisted of 30 subjects selected from the out-patient clinic at Orthodontic Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt. These selected patients required fixed appliance orthodontic therapy. The subjects were divided into three groups each bonded with different bracket type; stainless steel G1, Ceramic (G2), and self-ligating (G3); each ten subjects. A split mouth design was assigned as half of each arch, either the left or the right side, was randomly assigned to receive the experimental bracket, with the opposite side as the control. For each arch, either the left or the right premolars was selected to receive the experimental measurements. The measurements were in relative light units (RLU) values. Results: All groups showed non-significant measurements but G2 (ceramic brackets) recorded the highest measurement 104001.90 ± 17423.85 and the lowest measurement (36774.40 ± 8636.22) was observed in G3 (self-ligating bracket) after 4 weeks. Conclusion: The Self-ligating brackets are more hygienic. ATP-driven bioluminescence technique could serve as a useful tool in the rapid chair-side quantification of bacterial load and in the assessment and monitoring of oral hygiene during orthodontic treatment.

Hani Dalati

Royal College of Surgeons
UK

Title: Botox and dermal fillers use in dentistry
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Hani Dalati is a visiting Consultant in Orthodontist at Jeiroudi Orthodontic Centre in Abu Dhabi, a Partner at the Springs Dental Care and the Greengate Dental Centre in Leeds (UK), Associate Programme Leader (MClinDent in Orthodontics) at the City of London Dental School and Examiner at the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Dr Dalati was awarded the \'Lifetime Achievement\' Award of the American Biographical Institute in 2008, and he represented the United Kingdom to receive a Gold Medal from the American Biographical Institute in 2009. He was short listed on a numerous occasions for the UK-based Smile and Dental Awards. Dr Dalati has a number of publications and he is on the editorial and the review panels of a number of Scientific Dental Journals such as the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, and the Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Journal. He is an invited speaker to a number of National and International Dental and Facial Aesthetics Conferences.

Abstract:

This lecture will concentrate mainly on equipping the attending delegates with new ideas related to incorporating Botox and Dermal fillers into their dental practice where applicable in order to help them overcome a vast number of minor daily encountered obstacles. This will help them to improve their treatment plans and to achieve the desired/optimum results. The lecture additionally will cover other aspect such as: Patient assessment strategies, indications and contraindications to those techniques, Medico-legal aspects of incorporating those techniques into the daily practice, preparation and delivery of those materials, storage, dosage, selling strategies, management and treatment of possible complications, safety and risk issues related to Botox and Dermal Fillers and many others. In brief, this lecture objective is to enable attendees to know these practical concepts, techniques and to be familiar with the materials, techniques, and instrumentation of both aesthetic and therapeutic facial injectables – Botox and Dermal Fillers -.

Rashid Ahmed Chamda

University of witwatersrand
South Africa

Title: The 21 point cephalometric severity index
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Chamda is a specialist orthodontic consultant at the University of the Witwatersrand and has completed his third Master’s degree. He has a fellowship in Orthodontics from the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa. He is the vice president/secretary of the College of Dentistry and is the main examiner/convenor for the branch of Orthodontics. He was a Senator in the Colleges of Medicine. He has published several papers and has delivered many papers at conferences. He was invited to be a guest speaker in Egypt and Nigeria. He was awarded a scholarship by the British Dental Association and recently was awarded a research grant by the South African Dental Association .Dr Chamda has been accepted as a member of the Golden Key International Honour Society

Abstract:

Introduction. Indices have been developed over the years to describe the irregularity of teeth and classify the severity of a malocclusion.The grading of orthodontic treatment results has been used by many researchers to quantify irregularities and assess the success of clinical intervention.A literature search found no articles that quantitatively assessed the cephalometric severity of a malocclusion and quantitatively assessed the cephalometric changes that treatment had induced. Objectives: The aim of this research was i.) to examine the pre and post treatment study models of the Tip-Edge and Edgewise samples studied in part I and II of the study and ii) combine the data of the cephalometric and occlusal variables and devise a method to quantitatively measure the severity of the malocclusion. Methods This research involved the examination of the pre and post treatment study models of the two techniques and comparing the PAR indices 1. Combining the data of the cephalometric variables of the above and develop a method to quantitatively measure the severity of the malocclusion and devise an index to measure these changes.Results. The results demonstrate that both techniques produce similar results with a slightly improved occlusal finish for the Tip-Edge sample. The 21 point cephalometric severity index and the” Chamis” index provide a unique and simple quantitative method to accurately measure the severity of the malocclusions. Conclusions. The 21 point summary analysis will be a valuable tool in assessing the severity of a malocclusion, retrospectively evaluating the 21 point summary analysis will enable the clinician to assess the outcome of his treatment. Combining the occlusal score with the 21 point Index (Chamis Index) enhanced the quantitative score to a level of diagnostic precision not assessed previously.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Maher garduated from Damascus University - School of Dentistry (DDS) and specialized in Oral Medicine and Implantology (MSc) from the same university. Also, he is doing the Diploma Membership from the Royal College of Surgeons MFDSRCS(UK). Dr. Maher did a clinical master research in advanced implantology focusing on Interpositional bone grafting by using Piezoelectric Surgery. In Addition, he participated in several dental implant courses comprising all topics of Oral Implantology and organized by worldwide prominent dental implant systems. He was a clinical instructor in Oral Medicine and Radiology clinics in Damascus University – School of Dentistry and worked in many clinics in Syria and Jordan and currently he manages and works in the dental clinic in MedGate Center in Dubai.

Abstract:

Purpose: To radiographically assess the bone healing of bovine xenogenous bone blocks when used as inlays in the posterior mandible through measuring pixel grey values of bone graft regions and comparing them with preoperative normal bone values. Materials and Methods: 9 Inlay bone graft procedures were performed on 9 patients in the posterior mandible using bovine xenogenous bone blocks as inlays and PiezoSurgery for osteotomy. Digital periapicals were performed in periods of (preoperatively, postoperatively, after 3 months and after 6 months) and the resulted radiographs were imported to Medical Digora software to measure pixel grey values in bone graft and normal bone:bone graft interface regions, also measuring pixel grey values in normal bone preoperatively as a reference for assessment. t-student\'s test was used at the level of significance P < 0.05 and Pearson\'s correlation coefficient was calculated for statistical analysis. Results: Pixel grey values in normal bone:bone graft interface regions increase after 3 months and decrease after 6 months of surgery (P-Value <0.05) and pixel grey values in bone graft regions decrease after 3 months and increase after 6 months of surgery (P-Value <0.05). Pixel grey values in these two regions still far from preoperative normal bone pixel grey values when compared after 6 months. There is a strong correlation between pixel grey values in these two regions, approx. 97% after 3 months and 88% after 6 months. Conclusions: within the limitations of this study and based on the radiographic assessment, bovine xenogenous bone blocks used as inlays in the posterior mandible need more than 6 months to heal completely as normal bone and there is a strong correlation in pixel grey values between the bone graft and normal bone:bone graft interface regions. Keywords: Inlay Bone Grafting, Bovine Xenogenous Bone Blocks, Digital Radiography, Pixel Grey Value and Piezosurgery.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Maen Mahfouz is a lecturer at the Dental faculty - Arab American University- Jenin, Palestine. He received his DDS degree in 1998 from Al-Ba’ath University in Humus, Syria and his MDS and Specialty in Orthodontics - Pediatric Dentistry in 2003 from Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. He is Certified by P. Med. Council (Palestinian Board in Orthodontics) 2005. He is a fellow of World Federation of orthodontists. He has shared many of international conferences in different countries. He is an author of several published papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

It is well known that the leading factors for orthodontic patients to attend orthodontic office either due to esthetic concern , functional concern or / and oral health concern. In this presentation the light has been thrown on one of fundamental aspects in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment that is function by presenting clinical case demonstrating the importance of this phase in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment .

Break: Coffee Break @ Ball Room Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Shefqet Mrasori has completed his PhD at the age of 47 years from the University of Tirana, Dental Faculty (Republic of Albania) and postdoctoral studies from University of Prishtina School of Medicine. He is the executive director of the University Dental Clinical Center of Kosovo. He has published 6 papers in regional journals and had active participation in many International Conferences. He’s member of European Endodontic Society (ESE), Kosovo Dental Chamber and Kosovo Endodontic Society. His primary research interests are electronic apex locators and biocompatible provisional materials for root canal treatment.

Abstract:

Introduction: Evaluation and determination of working length during endodontic treatment is an significant valuable factor for the success of endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate In Vitro the accuracy and reliability of ProPex Dentsply apex locator utilizing stereomicroscope and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Thirty maxillary single root teeth from 49 patients are included in this study. After teeth preparation for In Vitro measurements using file no. 13, teeth are immersed into alginate plastic molds to create optimal experimental conditions. The file was slowly inserted into the canal till the device screen/audio signal showed 0.0 or anatomic apex, followed by 1 mm withdraw up to the calibration margin/working length (showed on the display, and then silicon stopper is positioned at the crown margin). The file was pulled out and the distance between file tips and silicon stopper was measured with Mini Endo Block. Following this measurement, file is returned back inside the root canal and the endodontic cavity is filled with flowable light curing composite to fix the file for further measurements. Sequentially radiologic working length determination is performed using Computed Dental Radiography (CDR, Schick Technology) followed by CBCT (Sirona, Galileos Confort Plus) and stereomicroscope (Brunel Microscope 130 M). The working lengths of the root canals were compared to a control length measurement performed by Computerized Digital Radiography and the differences were tested using an independent-sample t-test, meanwhile, the distance from the apical foramen as measured by CBCT and stereomicroscope was used to determine the accuracy of ProPex apex locator within the 0.5 mm of the measurement. Results: Statistical analysis was performed using STATA software Version 11. Results from comparative measurements using apex locators and CDR (19.99 mm /±1.35 and 20.15 mm/±1.33) cannot reject the null hypothesis that the length measurements are different from control lengths at a high significance level. P-values of the t-tests was >0.10 (P=0.6609). The results obtained using Pearson’s χ2 test conducted for the differences between the measurement results using CBCT and stereomicroscope falling within the distance ±0.5 mm from the apical foramen were accurate (χ2 =0.9 , 87%). Conclusion: Within limitations of this in vitro study, ProPex Dentsply electronic apex locator expressed sufficient precision and reliability in determining root canal working length. Key Words: Endodontic, apex locator, working length, CBCT

Balajee Krishnamurthy

European Society of Lingual Orthodontics
Kuwait

Title: Desert Orthodontics – Adults can do it too!
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

A major objection to braces or fixed appliances always has been their visible placement on the facial surface of the teeth. The introduction of bonding in 1970’s made it possible to place fixed attachments on the Lingual surface of the teeth. Recent progress in Europe & Asia has made Lingual orthodontics much more widely used there. Major advancements in technology and bracket design has made Lingual Orthodontics a reality with success rate equivalent to normal braces. More recently advances in Aligner mode of therapy has come off age. Though not all cases are suitable for this type of treatment. It is certainly a game changer in the Adult Orthodontics. The following will be reviewed in brief • A peek into the history of Lingual Orthodontics • Milestones in its development. • Treatment concepts. • Technological Advancements. • Treated cases. • The new Aligner option. • Historical perspective on Invisalign. • Treated cases.

Biography:

Dr. Manal Abu Al-Melh has obtained her Master’s Degree in Orthodontics from the University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, San Francisco, California and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Developmental and Preventive Sciences (Orthodontics) at Kuwait University, Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait.

Abstract:

Introduction: Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NCL/P) is a common craniofacial malformation with a multifactorial etiology. The genetic component of NCL/P etiology is complex with multiple genes involved. We are investigating single-nucleotide polymorphisms of three genes that are considered in some studies to be associated with NCL/P: two genes that are involved in control of the folate metabolism -MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) and RFC1 (reduced folate carrier 1) and TFGβ3 (transforming growth factor beta 3), which is among the strong susceptibility genes that have been shown to be involved in morphogenesis of lip and palate. Material and Methods: Cases and controls for the study were identified during the Rotaplast medical missions to Cebu City, Philippines in 2003, 2005, and 2007. Sample of cases consisted of 244 patients affected with NCL/P, 156 unaffected individuals from the same location formed the control sample. Venous blood was collected from both cases and controls and then preserved on filter papers. DNA was isolated from dry blood spots and amplified by PCR. Genotypes were established using PAGE for MTHFR 677C/T, RFC1 80A/G, and TGFβ3 rs2300607 A/T, and by sequencing for TGFβ3 rs2268625 C/T. Results: MTHFR 677C/T (230 cases, 156 controls). Significantly higher T allele frequency in cases than in controls (p=0.045) was found. No homozygote for the mutated allele T was observed in controls. The C allele frequency was 0.887 for cases and 0.933 for controls, while the T allele frequency was 0.113 for cases and 0.067 for controls. RFC1 80A/G (190 cases, 117 controls). There was found only a slightly higher (not statistically significant) G allele frequency in cases compared to controls and also no statistical difference in genotype distributions was observed. TGFβ3 rs23000607A/T (241 cases, 137 controls). No statistically significant difference in genotype distributions and in allele frequencies were observed. TGFβ3 rs2268625 C/T (244 cases and 133 controls) showed very interesting results. Significantly higher proportion of TT homozygotes was found among cases than among controls (p=0.021; 48.0% vs 33.8%). Frequency of the mutated T allele was 0.695 in cases and 0.598 in controls. This difference was also highly statistically significant (p=0.009). Conclusions: Our findings show association of rs2268625 C/T polymorphism of the TGFβ3 gene with NCL/P in Cebu City population and also suggest that MTHFR 677 C/T polymorphism may play a role in etiology of clefts in this location. No associations were found for RFC1 80 A/G and TGFβ3 rs2300607 A/T polymorphisms.

Speaker
Biography:

Morag Powell has been involved in the UK dental industry for 25 years. She is dually qualified, as a dental hygienist and a dental therapist, whose primary focus is delivering high quality dental care in private practice. She has a special interest in adult periodontics and peri-implantitis. Morag is currently studying for her BSc (Hons) in Dental Studies at University of Central Lancashire, and is an active member of ADI, BSDHT, BSP and BDHF.

Abstract:

Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory process occurring around dental implants. Following a systematic review in 2012,the reported frequency of peri-implant diseases was estimated at 64% for peri-implant mucocitis and 18% for peri-implantitis.This is an area of huge concern for the profession as only 18% of patients’ implants in the review were recorded as healthy. New guidance has been published indicating accepted treatment protocols in both the prevention and treatment of peri-implant diseases, with non-surgical periodontal therapy advised as the initial treatment option prior to referring for surgical therapy. A mini systematic review was conducted looking at the effectiveness of Glycine based powders in the treatment of peri-implant diseases. Literature was collected from databases including Pubmed and Google Scholar with inclusion criteria of glycine, air abrasion and peri-implant diseases. The hierarchy and quality of evidence was appraised with a CASP tool. The results show that Glycine based powders have been proven to be efficient in the treatment of peri-implant diseases in disruption of the sub-gingival biofilm, with the advantage of not altering the titanium surfaces of the implants. The glycine powder has been shown to have greater effect on: the reduction of bleeding on probing around implants; greater patient comfort; gentler on the tissues; and safe. It has been shown to be reliable, time saving, and hasalso shown to reduce numbers of P.gingivalis in the mouth - after full mouth disinfection with the Glycine based powder - compared to SRP alone.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Lana Dalbah, has completed her dental degree from university of Jordan in 2002, and her masters and specialty degree in Orthodontics from the university of the Pacific, San Francisco, California in 2007. She is a Diplomat of the American Board of Orthodontics. She is the former chair and director of the postgraduate orthodontic program at the Boston University in Dubai. Currently, she is an assistant professor in the postgraduate orthodontic program in the EUC, European University College in Dubai (formerly the Nicholas & Asp), and holds a part time private practice too. Dr. Lana has special interest in interceptive orthodontics and multidisciplinary treatments. She is the head of the multidisciplinary committee at the EUC College.

Abstract:

Orthodontic treatment is perceived by many dental practitioners as the comprehensive two year treatment that is recommended for patients with malocclusions such as crowding, spacing, deep bite, open bite, under bite,…etc. This presentation will discuss how limited orthodontic treatment (to either one arch or few teeth), and for a short period of time, can be added to your comprehensive treatment plan to enhance tremendously the esthetic, restorative, and periodontal outcome of your adult cases. Congenitally missing permanent teeth is also one of the common issues we see in the dental practice. Management of those cases from a multidisciplinary approach will also be discussed to know what options you can offer your patients depending on their growth status and financial capabilities. Learning Objectives: • To be able to decide which cases would benefit from limited orthodontic treatment for better restorative, esthetic, and periodontal outcomes. • To learn how to manage missing permanent teeth in growing vs. non-growing patients • To learn about smile design and smile components

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Arash Poorsattar Bejeh Mir was born and educated in Iran. He started medicine at the age of 18 in 2001, and entered internship in 2007. He continued his education in the field of dentistry from 2008 to 2013. He is currently a researcher at Babol University of Medical Sciences (Dental Materials Research Center) and also at AJA University of Medical Sciences (Photodynamic Therapy, Laser Research Section). He has published 45 national and international papers and two handbooks in various fields. Also, he served as a reviewer of more than 10 prestigious international dental Journal. His in-depth interest is orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics, seeking higher education in this discipline.

Abstract:

Background: Informative data about both hard and soft tissues of a patient’s palate are crucial before insertion of a miniscrew. Methods and Materials: This study consisted of 37 adult patients (21 females and 16 males) aged between 20 to 50 years with the mean age of 34.81 (±9.52) years. Hard tissue and soft tissues of the anterior hard palate was assessed using a CBCT device. Two anterio-posterior reference lines at 4 and 8 mm distal to the posterior wall of incisive foramen and 5 parallel medio-lateral lines at the suture with 3mm intervals on the sides were selected and measurements were performed at the intersecting points in ninety-degree paracoronal reconstructed views. Reliability of the method was assessed using an interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a P<0.05 considered significant. Results: A great variability was discovered between the individuals. The overall ICC was 0.99. Total vertical bone height decreased posteriorly and laterally. Mucosal thickness decreased posteriorly, but increased laterally. Men had thicker bone than the female patients. Age had site- and gender-specific effect on bone thickness. Age and gender had no effect of mucosal thickness. Palatal cortical thicknesses were higher than the nasal cortical thicknesses. Generally, right and left side had no clinically significant difference, but some site-specific statistically differences were found between the palatal sides. Conclusion: Within the limits of the study, palatal miniscrews may be placed best 4mm posterior to the incisive canal and 3mm to the paramedian in terms of balanced low mucosal thickness and high vertical bone depth.

Biography:

Abstract:

Occlusal loading affects the longevity of teeth, periodontium, joints, implants and dental restorations. Teeth morphology relates to occlusal loading. Form follows function. Today’s challenge is to give patient good aesthetics and good function which will be harmonious with masticatory muscles. In this lecture master key will be presented for predictable aesthetics and occlusion which will be useful for implant as well as normal day to day practice. Is it possible to reduce occlusal overload? How to increase longevity of restorations? How to plan treatment in patients with bruxism and para function? Is it possible to eliminate para functional habits?Can occlusal corrections relieve stresses ? How to make occlusal scheme for implants and for natural dentition? How to enhance aesthetic results at the same time improving occlusion? Master key in treatment planning and its execution will be presented to solve these puzzles.

  • Track 2: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Location: Crown Plaza, Dubai
Speaker

Chair

Zainul A Rajion

Universiti Sains Malaysia
Malaysia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Wamiq Musheer Fareed

Taibah University
Saudi Arabia

Session Introduction

Jules Poukens

University Hasselt
Belgium

Title: 3D printing : A new way for building body spare parts and implants ?
Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Dr. Jules Poukens is currently lecturer and researcher at the Biomed Research Institute of the University Hasselt and the University of Leuven in Belgium. He is a Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgeon at the Medical Center Sittard /Heerlen in the Netherlands. He got his M.D. and D.M.D from the Catholic University Leuven in Belgium. He was trained as Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgeon in Belgium (Leuven) and Germany (Freiburg, Black Forrest). After his training, he first joined the staff at the University Hospital Maastricht and later on the staff of Medical Center Sittard /Heerlen in the Netherlands. He has participated in several European Community funded projects on medical rapid prototyping and manufacturing and was acting chairman of the Board of Directors of the EU funded project CUSTOM-IMD. He was the leading surgeon that designed and implanted the world’s first 3D printed total mandibular implant and was one of the pioneers in using 3D printed skull implants. He has numerous publications and held numerous presentations in this field. Born and raised in Belgium, Jules searched for his roots and lives with his wife and two daughters in Dilsen, Belgium near the Dutch and German border.

Abstract:

Patients in the cranio-maxillofacial clinic often present with serious, complex, and potentially life- threatening or life-limiting medical conditions (e.g. tumor, trauma, aggressive osteomyelitis). Available treatments may not always give satisfactory results for patients and doctors. Therefore, complex problems ask for new solutions. An emerging technique in the medical field is Computer Aided Design (CAD) , Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) by 3D printing. For successful implementation of CAD-CAM technology in the clinical practice doctors, dentists and engineers need to work together and share their expertise. This intense cooperation leads to 3D printing of custom patient specific implants and prosthesis. 3D printed implants are used for the treatment of skull defects, dental superstructures and world’s first 3D printed entire mandible replacement implant. Clinical cases will be highlighted.

Marco Piras

Policlinico Città di Quartu
Italy

Title: Aesthetic and function In ortohognathic surgery
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Marco Piras attended the University of Cagliari becoming a Dentist in 1973, and the University of Naples until 1983 when he got the Degree of specialization in Maxillofacial surgery. He also completed two master degrees, one in Cosmetic Morphodynamic Surgery at the University of Milan, and the other in Temporomandibular Joint Surgery at the University of Rome La Sapienza. He is the director of the Maxillofacial surgery unit at the Città di Quartu Medical Center, in Sardinia, and chief of the scientific board of ABADO.

Abstract:

While orthognathic surgery provides a significant improvement in ccc dento facial and air way function, proper preoperative planning can significantly enhance facial harmony and balance as well. The more commonly aesthetic surgical procedures to improve the final outcome of orthognathic surgery can be perfomed simultaneously with orthognatic surgey or in a different time. The combination of soft tissue procedures to enhance the final aesthetic result of orthognathic surgery is a valuable addition to the orthodonthic and orthognathic treatment plan.While the bone surgery techniques are popular and well known, The aesthethic procedures, more often adopted, are , as we show, chin surgery-that influence the facial height, the facial centre-lines and the appearance of the nose; liposuction and liposculture – to treat a “doble chin”, to define a better jaw-line, to fill some empty important aesthethic zones of the face (zigomatic region, lips, naso-labial lines etc.). Rinoplasty as well is often performed. We need to remind how the new digital 3D XR techniques improved the global planning of the treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Mahmoud Alsuleiman has completed his PhD in Orthodontics from The Council of All-Union Scientific-and Industrial Association \"Stomatology\" – Advanced Faculty of Stomatology (Moscow, Russia), 1991. He Was a Head of the Orthodontic Department at University of Aleppo, 1993-2005, 2011-2012 and Vice Dean for the Scientific Affairs at the Dental School, University of Aleppo, 1997-1999. Now working consultant of Orthodontics at Planet Dental Clinics, Jeddah – Saudi Arabia. . He has published more than 22 papers in reputed journals and supervised 12 Master dissertations and 2 PhD dissertations.

Abstract:

Enamel demineralization is a significant problem and can cause major clinical complications of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Prevalence of white spot lesions after orthodontics treatment reported to varying from one-third up to 96 per cent in patients undergoing fixed appliance therapy. The placement of fixed orthodontic appliances creates a favorable environment for the accumulation of microorganisms, which causes enamel demineralization or exacerbates the effects of any pre-existing caries. Methods: A total of 569 brackets bonded in 30 patients with the Self etching primer (SEP) (Transbond Plus) and randomly divided into two groups: Group 1: 284 brackets (15 patients) (Control group). Group 2: 285 brackets bonded by SEP for 10s at the same time of amorphous calcium phosphate application and after 3 months repeated each month till the sixth month. This clinical trials have used the split-mouth design. The observation period was 6 months. SOPROLIFE -Light induce Fluorescence used to evaluate enamel around bracket. Results: Statistically significant differences observed between the two groups (P< 0.05) and teeth which had treated with amorphous calcium phosphate revealed reducing percent of white spot comparing to control group Conclusions: The monthly application amorphous calcium phosphate (GC Tooth Mousse), is effective on prevention of demineralization around orthodontic brackets during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Purpose: To verify the efficiency of intra alveolar administration of Chlorexidine gel, Alvogyl paste and surgical sponge soaked in tetracycline in prevention of inflammatory complications after mandibular third molar surgery. Material and Methods: Data were collected prospectively for one hundred and eight mandibular extracted third molars among 51 female and 45 male patients, age range 17 - 38, were divided proportionally in four groups, 27 each in: Chlorexidine gel (Group A), Alvogyl paste (Group B), surgical sponge soaked in tetracycline solution (Group C) and control group which didn\'t receive any topical agent (Group D). Degree of impaction and was documented using Pell and Gregory classification, meanwhile, difficulty of surgery was evaluated utilizing Parant scale. After surgical removal topical agents were placed into the extraction socket except at the control group. Standard post operative instructions are explained (cryotherapy and administration of analgesics). Facial swelling, inflammation, triusmus and pain level were evaluated in all four groups after twelve, twenty four, forty eight hours after surgery and seven days post-extraction. In order to assess the impact of treatment on the Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) of the patients at 24 hours and 7 days post-extraction. Results: Chlorexidine 0.2 % gel (Group A) and sponge soaked in tetracycline (Group C) showed a significant reduction of postoperative swelling, pain and trismus (p<0.05), compare to Alvogyl paste (Group B) and control group (Group D). The complication rate according to degree of impaction and degree of surgery was 1.9 times greater among females than among males (χ2=2.85, p=0.044). At the control group (Group D) alveolar osteitis was noted at five subjects (four female and one male) and this was statistically significant (P=0.017). Using the Wilcoxon test for paired samples OHRQoL of the patients at 24 hour and 7 days post-extraction gave statistically significant differences between Chlorexidine and tetracycline sponge groups in comparison to Alvogyl and control group. Conclusion: Post-extraction endoalveolar application of Chlorexidine 0.2% gel and sponge soaked in tetracycline were effective in reducing frequency of inflammatory complications following mandibular third molar surgery.

Biography:

Dr. Ghada Kamal ElMorshedy has had her MOSRCSEd 2006, FDSRCSEd 2013 ,and she is working as Consultant / Association Professor at Misr University Teaching Hospital, ElSheikh Zayed Hospital , National Bank Hospital, Cairo. She has been extensive work on Distraction Osteogenesis to correct facial deformities and Piere Rhobin Syndrome. She has presented more than 15 papers in reputed journals and conferances on Distraction Osteogenesis and cleft palate. Her recent addition to repair alveolar cleft is highly innovated.

Abstract:

Alveolar cleft is a part of cleft lip and or palate. Repair of alveolar cleft can vary from early childhood to late pre-adulthood. Various procedures had been advocated for proper repair, bone grafting ,fat grafting ,distraction osteogenesis, stem cells and BMP, have been used by many authors with reasonable rate of success the outcome of alveolar cleft repair has to be assessed quantitatively and qualitatively This is concise review of the procedures and the outcome with special emphasis on the advantages , indications and possible complications.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The purpose of this article is to discuss the clinical considerations related to increasing the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) when restoring a patient's dentition. Thorough extra-oral and intraoral evaluations are mandatory to assess the suitability of increasing OVD. In the literature, multiple techniques have been proposed to quantify OVD loss. However, the techniques lack consistency and reliability, which in turn affects the decision of whether to increase the OVD. Therefore, increasing OVD should be determined on the basis of the dental restorative needs and aesthetic demands. In general, a minimal increase in OVD should be applied, though a 5 mm maximum increase in OVD can be justified to provide adequate occlusal space for the restorative material and to improve anterior teeth aesthetics. The literature reflects the safety of increasing the OVD permanently, and although signs and symptoms may develop, these are usually of an interim nature. The exception to this is for patients with TMD, where increasing the OVD should still be achieved using removable appliances to control TMD-associated symptoms before considering any form of irreversible procedure.

Jose Fontes

Fernando Pessoa University
Portugal

Title: Interpositional bone graft - restoring anatomy
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. José Fontes has completed his Dental Degree in Fernando Pessoa University (Porto, Portugal – 2006) followed by the Specialist Degree at I.S.C.S. Norte (Porto, Portugal – 2009)). He is a member of the International Team for Implantology since 2006 and he is been placing implants since then. His practice is mainly surgical (London – U.K.) and his aims are to offer his patients the best quality treatment by restoring not only the function but also the dento-alveolar anatomy as the demands for cosmetic outcomes are increasing.

Abstract:

Missing teeth can easily be replaced with implant supported crowns nowadays. Often however we come to obstacles related with the lack of bone which may compromise the treatment. An interpositional bone graft is a predictable surgery that provides the area with the missing bone in order to achieve the anatomy required for an aesthetic outcome. There are other methods to restore that anatomy; Interpositional grafting however provides a predictable result and this has evidence based results. We will share a case using an interposition block graft with vascularized osteotomy from treatment planning to completion.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ahmed Al-Dam is a Senior Consultant Maxillofacial Surgeon at the University Medical Centre Hamburg, the largest Maxillofacial Department –in one hospital- in Germany. He studied Medicine and then Dentistry in Frankfurt (Germany) and then finished his Facharzt (Fellowship of the German Board) of Maxillofacial Surgery in 2009. Since 2012 Dr. Dr. Al-Dam is a Fellow of the European Board of Oral-Maxillo-Facial Surgery and Head&Neck Surgery (FEBOMFS-HNS). In 2013 he obtained the supplementary qualification in Regional Plastic Surgery. He is a specialist in Head and Neck surgical oncology and microvascular reconstruction and has performed over 300 major oncological procedures. Traumatology, Orthognathic Surgery, implantology and rehabilitation of the paralysed face belong to his main focuses.

Abstract:

Purpose:
The reconstruction of large facial bony defects using microvascular transplants requires extensive surgery to achieve full rehabilitation of form and function. This retrospective study evaluates the virtual planning tool ProPlan CMF® in 30 consecutive cases to enhance precision and efficiency of the reconstructions. Methods: Thirty patients with virtual planned immediate or secondary microvascular reconstructions of bony and soft tissue defects of the mandible and maxilla were acquired for this study. The virtual planning was done using ProPlan CMF® (Materialise NV, Leuven, Belgium). Postoperatively, a CBCT scan was used to access the accuracy and precision of the acquired results in comparison to the virtual planned outcome. Results:
63 bone segments were transplanted. In average, the deviations between the virtual planning and the postoperative situation were for the defect sizes +1.17mm, for the resection planes +/- 1.69mm and 10.16° and for the planes of the donor segments 10.81°. The orientation of the segments differed by 6.68° from the virtual plan, the length of the segments differed by – 0.12mm and +0.17%, respectively, while the volume differed by -31.02%. Conclusions:
ProPlan CMF® is a reliable and precise tool for virtual planning of microvascular bony reconstructions in the head and neck.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Hamed Orafi (BDS,MDS (OMFS)(FICS)(AAOMFA)(IAOMFS) has completed his MD at the age of 33 years from Trinity College Dublin (TCD),post doctoral research with Gothenburge university Sweden, he is an ex-dean at Benghazi dental school & hospital, now he is senior clinical consltant at (JUST), he is a member of Egyptian &Arab & African & international association of oral & maxillofacial surgery & American association of oral & maxillofacial surgeons, he is an external examiner in many MENA dental schools

Abstract:

Objective- The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic jaw cysts in a Libyan population and to compare the data with previously published reports from other countries. Materials and methods- We retrieved and analyzed 2190 case notes and biopsy records of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Al Arab Medical Sciences University, Benghazi, Libya, dating from January 1990 to December 2005. There were 326 cases (14.8%) of diagnosed odontogenic cysts among the 2190 biopsies performed during this period. The cases were analyzed for age and sex distribution, site of presentation, association with impacted teeth, and the method of treatment. Results- The male to female ratio of patients was 1.3:1 Radicular cysts accounted for 222 cases (68.1%), followed by dentigerous cysts (n=49, 15%) and odontogenickeratocysts (n=43, 14.1%). Mean ages of the patients were, respectively, 31.7, 22.7 and 36.1 years. . The maxilla was more commonly involved than the mandible (1.3:1). The anterior maxilla was the commonest site (n=132, 37.4%) followed by the posterior mandible (n=96, 29.4%). Fifty three cases were associated with impacted teeth, and the highest frequency was for dentigerous cysts (n=37). Enucleation and curettage was performed on 300 patients, marsupialization on 14, and marginal/segmental resection on 12. Conclusion- To our knowledge, this is the first such study on a Libyan population. Our results are comparable to studies from other countries. Knowledge of the relative frequencies and sites of presentation of odontogenic cysts in different ethno-geographic backgrounds is essential for the early diagnosis and management of these benign yet potentially destructive lesions

Break: Coffee Break @ Ball Room Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Rajion leads the Craniofacial Medical Imaging Cluster. His research interests include 3D craniofacial reconstruction, deformities and biomaterial. He obtained his PhD in 3D morphometric analysis in children with cleft lip and palate in 2004 from University Adelaide, Australia. He subsequently made research visits to Maastricht and Radboud Universities, Netherlands and Oral Imaging Centre, Leuven. He further obtained a Certificate for Entrepreneurship Learning from University of Cambridge in 2010. He is an Editor in chief of Archives of Orofacial Sciences, USM. He is also reviewer of international and national journals. He has published widely in the area of craniofacial imaging both nationally and internationally.

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Ameloblastoma is a slow-growing, persistent and locally invasive benign tumour of epithelial in origin. The aim is to measure and compare tumour volume of patients with ameloblastoma based on computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) images. METHODS:This is across sectional study of patients with ameloblastoma attending Hospital UniversitiSains Malaysia from January 2001 and December 2011 with histologically benign and previously untreated ameloblastoma. Craniofacial images were retrieved and analyzed using open-source MITK 3M3 software and ABC/2 estimation technique. RESULTS: The ratio of male to female patients diagnosed is 2:1. The range of age is from 15 to 55 years old with the mean age 31.36. Out of 22 patients, 21 ameloblastoma occurred in the mandible (95.5%) and 1 in the maxilla (4.5%). From 15 patients with craniofacial imaging available, 66.7% are multilocular and the others are unilocular (33.3%). The commonest site of occurrence is at premolar to molar region (44.4%), followed by the region from third molar to condyle (41.6%). The mean volume of tumour calculated by MITK-3M3 is 57.43ml (SD=47.18ml) while mean volume estimated by ABC/2 algorithm is 53.74ml (SD=41.45ml). TheWilcoxon Sign Rank Test analysis showed no significant difference in the volume measurements between MITK 3M3 software and ABC/2 estimation technique (r=3, p=0.241). CONCLUSION: The volumetricassessment using MITK 3M3 and ABC/2 provide accurate and reliable estimation of tumour volume, which can later be used for tumour growth prediction based on craniofacial imaging. KEYWORDS: Ameloblastoma, volume measurement, craniofacial imaging

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. S.Mohanavalli, MDS,has completed post graduate degree in Oral & Maxillo Facial surgery in 2001 from Tamil Nadu Govt Dental college -Dr MGR Medical University-Chennai,INDIA. Associate professor in the department of maxiilofacial surgery in SRM Dental college from 2001 onwards. She has published 5 article in reputed journals,presented sceitific papers in various conferences. Examiner and Question paper setter for under grduates and post graduated students . Post graduate guide since 2006 onwards .Research area is tissue engineering-dental pulp stem cells.

Abstract:

The existence of adult stem cell in dental pulp was revealed by Granthos et al -2000.Human dental pulp tissue contains heterogeneous potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our goal is to understand the state of the art in the dental pulp stem cell research and to develop predictable protocols ,evidence based steps and outcomes of bone regeneration by using DPSC, bioactive scaffolds, growth factors and future application in craniofacial tissue engineering. Defects due to congenital , traumatic, iatrogenic should be repaired and replaced as natural as possible with minimal tissue morbidity. Dental pulp is the mesenchymal type of multi potent stemcell and potential to differentiation into osteocytes ,build invivo an adult bone with havers channels with vascularization. Posses immunoprivilages can be grafted into allogenic tissues.Easy access to the collection site with less morbidity.DPSC have an extensive differentiation and proliferation capacity, can be cryopreserved, interactivity with several biomaterial, makes them ideal for tissue reconstruction. It is a boon for dental profession, the DSPC can be collected from the extracted wisdom teeth, premolars for the therapeutic purpose and from shedding deciduous teeth. Extirpating the dental pulp from the tooth is simple .In future research will focus to extirpate the pulp without removing the tooth from oral cavity by creating a sterile atmosphere ,same tooth can be preserved with minimal morbidity. The same dental pulp stem cells can be differentiated ,proliferated and cryopreserved for the future needs. DPSC is a boon for entire medical world not only for dental surgeon.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Wamiq Musheer Fareed is a Maxillofacial Surgeon by profession. His Education has been from India. He worked with Lord Buddha Medical College& Research Centre (Nepal) for 6 months as Maxillofacial Surgeon. He has also worked as a Subordinate/ Paraprofessional for duration of one year in Department of Oral Surgery in College of Dentistry (TaibahUniversity, Medina, KSA).At present, He is a Senior Faculty in the same university providing his services for the same department. He is an activemember of Saudi Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. His key focus areas are in orthognathic, craniofacial and trauma surgery but now he majorly practicesDento-alveolar surgery including surgical implantology along with the management of surgical pathology of the jaws and temporomandibular joint disease. He has a major interest in postgraduate Educationand medico-legal work. He is actively involved in lecturing and teaching internationally, and has published more than 5 peer-reviewed papers and few of them are under publication. He aims for a wider area for practicing his skills and serving the Maxillofacial Stream on a broader scale thereby implementing his learned practices and applied methodologies.

Abstract:

Hemangiomaisone of the commonest anomalies of the vascular tree and their management has all the time remained a foremost challenge. Surgery and other treatment modalities are not always suitable and agreeable; they have a higher morbidity, recurrence and complication rate. Few patients had undergone sclerotherapy with sodium tetradecyl sulfate solely or as an adjunct to surgery. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy and to get acceptable results.

Speaker
Biography:

Sabrin Ali Mohammed Azim is a specialist in Oral and Maxillofacial surgery. Specialised in such areas as trauma, cleft lip-palate, oncology, oral surgery and e.t.c. She has graduated from dentistry faculty, Azerbaijan Medical University in 2010. During that period she has written a scientific works and has participated in such university competition as: Student Scientific society, dentistry faculty 2007, 2009 2010 under the supervisor of the head of the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery prof.Rahimov Ch. . In 2012 she has finished her postgraduate program and became a specialist in oral and maxillofacial surgery. At the moment she continues her Ph.D program in oral and maxillofacial department in Azerbaijan Medical University and studies the quality of life in patients after cleft palate surgery under the supervisor prof. Yusubov Y.

Abstract:

Quality of life research provides patients and health-care providers with vital information about the impact that disease and its treatment has on physical, functional, social and emotional well-being. QoL outcomes are also being recognized as important prognostic variables, which help to predict which patients are most likely to benefit from treatment. Introduction: The quality of life is amorphous and multi- level concept and can vary in priority among people in different age group. Nowadays the quality of life is learned by many medical brances as therapy, surgery, oncology and etc.. We studied the quality of life in patients after cleft palate surgery. More than 200,000 children are born with cleft lip and palate each year, and the condition threatens both the life and livelihood of the child. Cleft may cause problems with feeding, ear disease, speech and socialization. Due to lack of suction, an infant with a cleft may have trouble feeding. But do all this problems finishes with surgical treatment? A cleft lip or palate can be successfully treated with surgery , especially so if conducted soon after birth or in early childhood. Most children who have their clefts repaired early enough are not able to have a happy youth and social life. Children who had a cleft palate repair need to see a dentist or orthodontist. The teeth may need to be corrected as they come in. We decided to study the patient who didn’t agree with our propose to be treated by orthodontist.And the patients who was treated by speech therapist and orthodontist.